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Cancer Lett. 2015 Mar 1;358(1):1-7. doi: 10.1016/j.canlet.2014.12.035. Epub 2014 Dec 17.

Lactate dehydrogenase 5: an old friend and a new hope in the war on cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Gastrointestinal and General Surgery, Wroclaw Medical University, ul. Sklodowskiej-Curie 66, 50-369 Wroclaw, Poland. Electronic address: katarzyna.augoff@am.wroc.pl.
2
Laboratory of Cytobiochemistry, Biotechnology Faculty, University of Wroclaw, Wroclaw, Poland.
3
Department of Gastrointestinal and General Surgery, Wroclaw Medical University, ul. Sklodowskiej-Curie 66, 50-369 Wroclaw, Poland.

Abstract

A hallmark of most cancer cells is an altered metabolism involving a shift to aerobic glycolysis with lactate production coupled with a higher uptake of glucose as the main source of energy. Lactate dehydrogenase 5 (LDH-5) catalyzes the reduction of pyruvate by NADH to form lactate, thus determining the availability of NAD(+) to maintain the continuity of glycolysis. It is therefore an important control point in the system of cellular energy release. Its upregulation is common in many malignant tumors. Inhibiting LDH-5 activity has an anti-proliferative effect on cancer cells. It may reverse their resistance to conventional chemo- and radiotherapy. Recent research has renewed interest in LDH-5 as an anticancer drug target. This review summarizes recent studies exploring the role of LDH-5 in cancer growth, its utility as a tumor marker, and developments made in identifying and designing anti-LDH-5 therapeutic agents.

KEYWORDS:

Aerobic glycolysis; Cancer metabolism; Lactate dehydrogenase 5 (LDH-5)

PMID:
25528630
DOI:
10.1016/j.canlet.2014.12.035
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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