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Atherosclerosis. 2015 Feb;238(2):231-8. doi: 10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2014.12.010. Epub 2014 Dec 9.

High-oleic canola oil consumption enriches LDL particle cholesteryl oleate content and reduces LDL proteoglycan binding in humans.

Author information

1
Richardson Centre for Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. Electronic address: Peter.Jones@umanitoba.ca.
2
Richardson Centre for Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.
3
St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
4
Institute of Nutrition and Functional Foods, Laval University, Quebec City, QC, Canada.
5
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Pennsylvania State University, PA, USA.
6
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Pennsylvania State University, PA, USA; Department of Biobehavioral Health, Pennsylvania State University, PA, USA.
7
Department of Biochemistry Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA.
8
Department of Biochemistry Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA; Department of Pathology, Section on Lipid Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA.

Abstract

Oleic acid consumption is considered cardio-protective according to studies conducted examining effects of the Mediterranean diet. However, animal models have shown that oleic acid consumption increases LDL particle cholesteryl oleate content which is associated with increased LDL-proteoglycan binding and atherosclerosis. The objective was to examine effects of varying oleic, linoleic and docosahexaenoic acid consumption on human LDL-proteoglycan binding in a non-random subset of the Canola Oil Multi-center Intervention Trial (COMIT) participants. COMIT employed a randomized, double-blind, five-period, cross-over trial design. Three of the treatment oil diets: 1) a blend of corn/safflower oil (25:75); 2) high oleic canola oil; and 3) DHA-enriched high oleic canola oil were selected for analysis of LDL-proteoglycan binding in 50 participants exhibiting good compliance. LDL particles were isolated from frozen plasma by gel filtration chromatography and LDL cholesteryl esters quantified by mass-spectrometry. LDL-proteoglycan binding was assessed using surface plasmon resonance. LDL particle cholesterol ester fatty acid composition was sensitive to the treatment fatty acid compositions, with the main fatty acids in the treatments increasing in the LDL cholesterol esters. The corn/safflower oil and high-oleic canola oil diets lowered LDL-proteoglycan binding relative to their baseline values (p = 0.0005 and p = 0.0012, respectively). At endpoint, high-oleic canola oil feeding resulted in lower LDL-proteoglycan binding than corn/safflower oil (p = 0.0243) and DHA-enriched high oleic canola oil (p = 0.0249), although high-oleic canola oil had the lowest binding at baseline (p = 0.0344). Our findings suggest that high-oleic canola oil consumption in humans increases cholesteryl oleate percentage in LDL, but in a manner not associated with a rise in LDL-proteoglycan binding.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01351012.

KEYWORDS:

Cholesterol; Fatty acids; LDL; Nutrition; Oleic acid; Proteoglycan

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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