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Acad Pediatr. 2015 Jan-Feb;15(1):77-81. doi: 10.1016/j.acap.2014.06.008.

Risk factors for requiring intensive care among children admitted to ward with bronchiolitis.

Author information

1
Department of Emergency Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass. Electronic address: khasegawa1@partners.org.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Children's Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, Mo.
3
Department of Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Section of Emergency Medicine, Texas Children's Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Tex.
5
Department of Pediatrics, Rady Children's Hospital, University of California San Diego, Calif.
6
Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Tex; Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Tex.
7
Department of Emergency Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine risk factors for transfer of bronchiolitis patients from the ward to the intensive care unit (ICU) and/or initiation of critical care interventions.

METHODS:

We performed a 16-center, prospective cohort study of hospitalized children age <2 years with bronchiolitis. During the winters of 2007 to 2010, researchers collected clinical data and nasopharyngeal aspirates from study participants. The primary outcome was late intensive care use, defined as a transfer to the ICU and/or use of mechanical ventilation (regardless of location) after the child's first inpatient day.

RESULTS:

Among 2104 children hospitalized with bronchiolitis, 1762 (84%) were identified as initial ward patients, comprising the analysis cohort. The median age was 4 months (interquartile range, 2-9 months), and 1048 (59%) were boys. The most frequently detected pathogens were respiratory syncytial virus (72%) and rhinovirus (25%). After the first inpatient day, 47 (3%; 95% confidence interval, 2-4) were subsequently transferred to the ICU or required mechanical ventilation. In the multivariable logistic regression model predicting subsequent transfer to the ICU or mechanical ventilation use, the significant predictors were birth weight <5 pounds (odds ratio, 2.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.30-4.02; P = .004) and respiratory rate high of ≥ 70 breaths/min on the first inpatient day (odds ratio, 4.64; 95% confidence interval, 2.86-7.53; P < .001).

CONCLUSIONS:

In this multicenter study of children hospitalized with bronchiolitis, low birth weight and tachypnea were significantly associated with subsequent transfer to the ICU and/or use of mechanical ventilation.

KEYWORDS:

bronchiolitis; hospitalization; intensive care unit; mechanical ventilation; risk factors

PMID:
25528126
PMCID:
PMC4454380
DOI:
10.1016/j.acap.2014.06.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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