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J Mol Endocrinol. 2015 Feb;54(1):39-50. doi: 10.1530/JME-14-0272.

Modulation of monocarboxylate transporter 8 oligomerization by specific pathogenic mutations.

Author information

1
Institut für Experimentelle Pädiatrische EndokrinologieCharité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin, GermanyLeibniz-Institut für Molekulare PharmakologieBerlin, GermanyUniversitätsklinikum EssenKlinik für Endokrinologie und Stoffwechselerkrankungen, Essen, GermanyJacobs University BremenBremen, Germany.
2
Institut für Experimentelle Pädiatrische EndokrinologieCharité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin, GermanyLeibniz-Institut für Molekulare PharmakologieBerlin, GermanyUniversitätsklinikum EssenKlinik für Endokrinologie und Stoffwechselerkrankungen, Essen, GermanyJacobs University BremenBremen, Germany Heike.Biebermann@charite.de.

Abstract

The monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) is a member of the major facilitator superfamily (MFS). These membrane-spanning proteins facilitate translocation of a variety of substrates, MCT8 specifically transports iodothyronines. Mutations in MCT8 are the underlying cause of severe X-linked psychomotor retardation. At the molecular level, such mutations led to deficiencies in substrate translocation due to reduced cell-surface expression, impaired substrate binding, or decreased substrate translocation capabilities. However, the causal relationships between genotypes, molecular features of mutated MCT8, and patient characteristics have not yet been comprehensively deciphered. We investigated the relationship between pathogenic mutants of MCT8 and their capacity to form dimers (presumably oligomeric structures) as a potential regulatory parameter of the transport function of MCT8. Fourteen pathogenic variants of MCT8 were investigated in vitro with respect to their capacity to form oligomers. Particular mutations close to the substrate translocation channel (S194F, A224T, L434W, and R445C) were found to inhibit dimerization of MCT8. This finding is in contrast to those for other transporters or transmembrane proteins, in which substitutions predominantly at the outer-surface inhibit oligomerization. Moreover, specific mutations of MCT8 located in transmembrane helix 2 (del230F, V235M, and ins236V) increased the capacity of MCT8 variants to dimerize. We analyzed the localization of MCT8 dimers in a cellular context, demonstrating differences in MCT8 dimer formation and distribution. In summary, our results add a new link between the functions (substrate transport) and protein organization (dimerization) of MCT8, and might be of relevance for other members of the MFS. Finally, the findings are discussed in relationship to functional data combined with structural-mechanistical insights into MCT8.

KEYWORDS:

major facilitator superfamily; monocarboxylate transporter 8; oligomerization; pathogenic mutations

PMID:
25527620
DOI:
10.1530/JME-14-0272
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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