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BMC Dev Biol. 2014 Dec 20;14:47. doi: 10.1186/s12861-014-0047-4.

The role of Sox9 in mouse mammary gland development and maintenance of mammary stem and luminal progenitor cells.

Author information

1
Department of Genetics, Cell Biology and Anatomy, College of Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 985805 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5805, USA. gmalhotra@unmc.edu.
2
Department of Genetics, Cell Biology and Anatomy, College of Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 985805 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5805, USA. xzhao@unmc.edu.
3
Department of Genetics, Cell Biology and Anatomy, College of Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 985805 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5805, USA. ee.edwards@outlook.com.
4
Departments of Pediatrics and Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92093-0695, USA. jkopp@ucsd.edu.
5
Department of Genetics, Cell Biology and Anatomy, College of Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 985805 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5805, USA. mnaramura@unmc.edu.
6
Eppley Institute for Research in Cancer and Allied Diseases, and Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 985950 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5950, USA. mnaramura@unmc.edu.
7
Departments of Pediatrics and Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92093-0695, USA. masander@ucsd.edu.
8
Department of Genetics, Cell Biology and Anatomy, College of Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 985805 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5805, USA. hband@unmc.edu.
9
Departments of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 985805 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5805, USA. hband@unmc.edu.
10
Departments of Pathology & Microbiology and Pharmacology and Neuroscience, College of Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 985805 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5805, USA. hband@unmc.edu.
11
Departments of Pharmacology and Neuroscience, College of Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 985805 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5805, USA. hband@unmc.edu.
12
Department of Genetics, Cell Biology and Anatomy, College of Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 985805 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5805, USA. vband@unmc.edu.
13
Eppley Institute for Research in Cancer and Allied Diseases, and Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 985950 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5950, USA. vband@unmc.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Identification and characterization of molecular controls that regulate mammary stem and progenitor cell homeostasis are critical to our understanding of normal mammary gland development and its pathology.

RESULTS:

We demonstrate that conditional knockout of Sox9 in the mouse mammary gland results in impaired postnatal development. In short-term lineage tracing in the postnatal mouse mammary gland using Sox9-CreER driven reporters, Sox9 marked primarily the luminal progenitors and bipotent stem/progenitor cells within the basal mammary epithelial compartment. In contrast, long-term lineage tracing studies demonstrate that Sox9+ precursors gave rise to both luminal and myoepithelial cell lineages. Finally, fate mapping of Sox9 deleted cells demonstrates that Sox9 is essential for luminal, but not myoepithelial, lineage commitment and proliferation.

CONCLUSIONS:

These studies identify Sox9 as a key regulator of mammary gland development and stem/progenitor maintenance.

PMID:
25527186
PMCID:
PMC4297388
DOI:
10.1186/s12861-014-0047-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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