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Eur J Nutr. 2016 Feb;55(1):45-53. doi: 10.1007/s00394-014-0821-x. Epub 2014 Dec 20.

Low vitamin C values are linked with decreased physical performance and increased oxidative stress: reversal by vitamin C supplementation.

Author information

1
School of Physical Education and Sport Science, University of Thessaly, 42100, Karies, Trikala, Greece.
2
Department of Health Sciences, School of Sciences, European University Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus.
3
School of Physical Education and Sports Science at Serres, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 62110, Agios Ioannis, Serres, Greece.
4
School of Physical Education and Sports Science at Serres, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 62110, Agios Ioannis, Serres, Greece. nikolaidis@auth.gr.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

It has been suggested that part of the failure of antioxidant supplementation to reduce oxidative stress and promote health is that it has been administered in humans with normal levels of antioxidants.

METHODS:

To test this hypothesis, we screened 100 males for vitamin C baseline values in blood. Subsequently, the 10 individuals with the lowest and the 10 with the highest vitamin C values were assigned in two groups. Using a placebo-controlled crossover design, the 20 selected subjects performed aerobic exercise to exhaustion (oxidant stimulus) before and after vitamin C supplementation for 30 days.

RESULTS:

The low vitamin C group had lower VO2max values than the high vitamin C group. Vitamin C supplementation in this group marginally increased VO2max. Baseline concentration of F2-isoprostanes and protein carbonyls was higher in the low vitamin C group compared to the high vitamin C group. Vitamin C supplementation decreased the baseline concentration of F2-isoprostanes and protein carbonyls in both groups, yet the decrease was greater in the low vitamin C group. Before vitamin C supplementation, F2-isoprostanes and protein carbonyls were increased to a greater extent after exercise in the high vitamin C group compared to the low vitamin C group. Interestingly, after vitamin C supplementation, this difference was narrowed.

CONCLUSION:

We show for the first time that low vitamin C concentration is linked with decreased physical performance and increased oxidative stress and that vitamin C supplementation decreases oxidative stress and might increase exercise performance only in those with low initial concentration of vitamin C.

KEYWORDS:

Antioxidants; Exercise; Oxidative stress; Physical performance; Supplementation

PMID:
25526969
DOI:
10.1007/s00394-014-0821-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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