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Cell. 2014 Dec 18;159(7):1640-51. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2014.11.038.

The cellular and molecular basis of direction selectivity of Aδ-LTMRs.

Author information

1
Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 725 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.
2
Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 725 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Pathology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 725 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.
3
Department of Neurobiology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard Medical School, 220 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 725 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.
4
Department of Zoology and Physiology, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071, USA.
5
Department of Zoology and Physiology, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071, USA. Electronic address: woodbury@uwyo.edu.
6
Department of Neurobiology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard Medical School, 220 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 725 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. Electronic address: david_ginty@hms.harvard.edu.

Erratum in

Abstract

The perception of touch, including the direction of stimulus movement across the skin, begins with activation of low-threshold mechanosensory neurons (LTMRs) that innervate the skin. Here, we show that murine Aδ-LTMRs are preferentially tuned to deflection of body hairs in the caudal-to-rostral direction. This tuning property is explained by the finding that Aδ-LTMR lanceolate endings around hair follicles are polarized; they are concentrated on the caudal (downward) side of each hair follicle. The neurotrophic factor BDNF is synthesized in epithelial cells on the caudal, but not rostral, side of hair follicles, in close proximity to Aδ-LTMR lanceolate endings, which express TrkB. Moreover, ablation of BDNF in hair follicle epithelial cells disrupts polarization of Aδ-LTMR lanceolate endings and results in randomization of Aδ-LTMR responses to hair deflection. Thus, BDNF-TrkB signaling directs polarization of Aδ-LTMR lanceolate endings, which underlies direction-selective responsiveness of Aδ-LTMRs to hair deflection.

PMID:
25525881
PMCID:
PMC4297767
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2014.11.038
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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