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Ann Emerg Med. 2015 Apr;65(4):416-22. doi: 10.1016/j.annemergmed.2014.11.001. Epub 2014 Dec 15.

Poisoning in the United States: 2012 emergency medicine report of the National Poison Data System.

Author information

1
Rocky Mountain Poison Center, Denver Health, and the University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, CO. Electronic address: Richard.Dart@rmpdc.org.
2
Rocky Mountain Poison Center, Denver Health, and the University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, CO.
3
Department of Emergency Medicine, Oregon Poison Center, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR.
4
Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Medical Toxicology, Department of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD.
5
Department of Emergency Medicine, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, and New Mexico Poison and Drug Information Center, Albuquerque, NM.
6
California Poison Control System, School of Pharmacy, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA.
7
School of Pharmacy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.

Abstract

Deaths from drug overdose have become the leading cause of injury death in the United States, where the poison center system is available to provide real-time advice and collect data about a variety of poisonings. In 2012, emergency medical providers were confronted with new poisonings, such as bath salts (substituted cathinones) and Spice (synthetic cannabinoid drugs), as well as continued trends in established poisonings such as from prescription opioids. This article addresses current trends in opioid poisonings; new substances implicated in poisoning cases, including unit-dose laundry detergents, bath salts, Spice, and energy drinks; and the role of poison centers in public health emergencies such as the Fukushima radiation incident.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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