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J Sports Sci. 2015;33(10):1076-83. doi: 10.1080/02640414.2014.984752. Epub 2014 Dec 17.

Effects of caffeine chewing gum on race performance and physiology in male and female cyclists.

Author information

1
a EIT NZ, Health and Sport , Taradale , New Zealand.

Abstract

This investigation reports the effects of chewing caffeinated gum on race performance with trained cyclists. Twenty competitive cyclists completed two 30-km time trials that included a maximal effort 0.2-km sprint each 10-km. Caffeine (~3-4 mg · kg(-1)) or placebo was administered double-blind via chewing gum at the 10-km point following completion of the first sprint. Measures of power output, oxygen uptake, heart rate, lactate and perceived exertion were taken at set intervals during the time trial. Results indicated no substantial differences in any measured variables between caffeine and placebo conditions during the first 20-km of the time trial. Caffeine gum did however lead to substantial enhancements (mean ± 90% confidence limits (CLs)) in mean power during the final 10-km (3.8% ± 2.3%), and sprint power at 30-km (4.0% ± 3.6%). The increases in performance over the final 10-km were associated with small increases in heart rate and blood lactate (effect size of 0.24 and 0.28, respectively). There were large inter-individual variations in the response to caffeine, and apparent gender related differences in sprint performance. Chewing caffeine gum improves mean and sprint performance power in the final 10-km of a 30-km time trial in male and female cyclists most likely through an increase in nervous system activation.

KEYWORDS:

ergogenic; heart rate; lactate; sprint; time trial

PMID:
25517202
DOI:
10.1080/02640414.2014.984752
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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