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Behav Modif. 2015 May;39(3):390-412. doi: 10.1177/0145445514561317. Epub 2014 Dec 16.

Cognitive behavior therapy for anxiety in people with dementia: a clinician guideline for a person-centered approach.

Author information

1
University College London, UK North East London NHS Foundation Trust, UK g.charlesworth@ucl.ac.uk.
2
South Essex Partnership Foundation Trust, UK.
3
North East London NHS Foundation Trust, UK.
4
University College London, UK.

Abstract

This article describes a 10-session cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) used in a randomized controlled trial with people with anxiety and mild-to-moderate dementia. The aim of the therapy is to reduce symptoms of anxiety by increasing a sense of safety and self-efficacy. The therapy is characterized by a person-centered approach to CBT, using individual tailoring to accommodate for cognitive deficits and other challenges. Three phases of therapy are described: (a) socialization to model (including overcoming barriers to participation), goal setting, and formulation; (b) application of cognitive and behavioral change techniques to address unhelpful autonomic reactions, "strategic" reactions, "rules for living," and interpersonal aspects; and (c) consolidation and ending in the context of chronic, deteriorating illness. The approach prioritizes direct work with the person with dementia, with the involvement of a "supportive other" where available and when necessary. The protocol is designed for use by therapists with prior experience in CBT.

KEYWORDS:

CBT; anxiety; cognitive-behavioral therapy; dementia; manual

PMID:
25516019
DOI:
10.1177/0145445514561317
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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