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Nat Commun. 2014 Dec 16;5:5718. doi: 10.1038/ncomms6718.

High quality-factor optical nanocavities in bulk single-crystal diamond.

Author information

1
School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA.
2
Department of Physics, Harvard University, 17 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA.
3
1] School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA [2] University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1.
4
Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA.
5
Rowland Institute at Harvard, Harvard University, 100 Edwin H. Land Boulevard, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA.

Abstract

Single-crystal diamond, with its unique optical, mechanical and thermal properties, has emerged as a promising material with applications in classical and quantum optics. However, the lack of heteroepitaxial growth and scalable fabrication techniques remains the major limiting factors preventing more wide-spread development and application of diamond photonics. In this work, we overcome this difficulty by adapting angled-etching techniques, previously developed for realization of diamond nanomechanical resonators, to fabricate racetrack resonators and photonic crystal cavities in bulk single-crystal diamond. Our devices feature large optical quality factors, in excess of 105, and operate over a wide wavelength range, spanning visible and telecom. These newly developed high-Q diamond optical nanocavities open the door for a wealth of applications, ranging from nonlinear optics and chemical sensing, to quantum information processing and cavity optomechanics.

PMID:
25511421
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms6718

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