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PLoS One. 2014 Dec 11;9(12):e114261. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0114261. eCollection 2014.

Use of a Guinea pig-specific transcriptome array for evaluation of protective immunity against genital chlamydial infection following intranasal vaccination in Guinea pigs.

Author information

1
South Texas Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases and Center of Excellence in Infection Genomics, University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, Texas 78249, United Stats of America.
2
Departments of Pediatrics and Microbiology & Immunology, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Boulevard, Galveston, Texas 77555, United States of America.
3
US Army Institute of Surgical Research, 3650 Chambers Pass, BHT2, Building 3610/Room224-1, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234, United States of America.
4
Department of Pathology, Midwestern University, Downer's Grove, Illinois, 60148, United States of America.
5
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7702 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, Texas 78229, United States of America.
6
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, and Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Institute, Little Rock, Arkansas 72202, United States of America.

Abstract

Guinea pigs have been used as a second animal model to validate putative anti-chlamydial vaccine candidates tested in mice. However, the lack of guinea pig-specific reagents has limited the utility of this animal model in Chlamydia sp. vaccine studies. Using a novel guinea pig-specific transcriptome array, we determined correlates of protection in guinea pigs vaccinated with Chlamydia caviae (C. caviae) via the intranasal route, previously reported by us and others to provide robust antigen specific immunity against subsequent intravaginal challenge. C. caviae vaccinated guinea pigs resolved genital infection by day 3 post challenge. In contrast, mock vaccinated animals continued to shed viable Chlamydia up to day 18 post challenge. Importantly, at day 80 post challenge, vaccinated guinea pigs experienced significantly reduced genital pathology - a sequelae of genital chlamydial infections, in comparison to mock vaccinated guinea pigs. Sera from vaccinated guinea pigs displayed antigen specific IgG responses and increased IgG1 and IgG2 titers capable of neutralizing GPIC in vitro. Th1-cellular/inflammatory immune genes and Th2-humoral associated genes were also found to be elevated in vaccinated guinea pigs at day 3 post-challenge and correlated with early clearance of the bacterium. Overall, this study provides the first evidence of guinea pig-specific genes involved in anti-chlamydial vaccination and illustrates the enhancement of the utility of this animal model in chlamydial pathogenesis.

PMID:
25502875
PMCID:
PMC4263467
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0114261
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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