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Psychiatry Res. 2015 Feb 28;225(3):571-9. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2014.11.045. Epub 2014 Dec 4.

Living with tics: reduced impairment and improved quality of life for youth with chronic tic disorders.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; Department of Pediatrics, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA. Electronic address: jfmcguire@mail.usf.edu.
2
Department of Psychology, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; Department of Pediatrics, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA.
3
Department of Pediatrics, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA.
4
Department of Psychology, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; Department of Pediatrics, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; Departments of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA.
5
Department of Pediatrics, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; Departments of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; All Children׳s Hospital - Johns Hopkins Medicine, St. Petersburg, FL, USA.
6
Department of Psychology, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; Department of Pediatrics, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; Departments of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; Roger׳s Behavioral Health - Tampa Bay, Tampa, FL, USA; All Children׳s Hospital - Johns Hopkins Medicine, St. Petersburg, FL, USA.

Abstract

Pharmacological and behavioral interventions have focused on reducing tic severity to alleviate tic-related impairment for youth with chronic tic disorders (CTDs), with no existing intervention focused on the adverse psychosocial consequences of tics. This study examined the preliminary efficacy of a modularized cognitive behavioral intervention ("Living with Tics", LWT) in reducing tic-related impairment and improving quality of life relative to a waitlist control of equal duration. Twenty-four youth (ages 7-17 years) with Tourette Disorder or Chronic Motor Tic Disorder and psychosocial impairment participated. A treatment-blind evaluator conducted all pre- and post-treatment clinician-rated measures. Youth were randomly assigned to receive the LWT intervention (n=12) or a 10-week waitlist (n=12). The LWT intervention consisted of up to 10 weekly sessions targeted at reducing tic-related impairment and developing skills to manage psychosocial consequences of tics. Youth in the LWT condition experienced significantly reduced clinician-rated tic-impairment, and improved child-rated quality of life. Ten youth (83%) in the LWT group were classified as treatment responders compared to four youth in the waitlist condition (33%). Treatment gains were maintained at one-month follow-up. Findings provide preliminary data that the LWT intervention reduces tic-related impairment and improves quality of life for youth with CTDs.

KEYWORDS:

Chronic tic disorders; Cognitive behavior therapy; Functional impairment; Quality of life; Tourette Disorder; Treatment outcome

PMID:
25500348
PMCID:
PMC4314444
DOI:
10.1016/j.psychres.2014.11.045
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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