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Int J Food Microbiol. 2015 Feb 16;195:30-9. doi: 10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2014.11.028. Epub 2014 Dec 3.

Cinnamon bark oil and its components inhibit biofilm formation and toxin production.

Author information

1
School of Chemical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749, Republic of Korea.
2
Nareso Research Center, Seoho-ro 89, Suwon 441-853, Republic of Korea.
3
School of Biotechnology, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749, Republic of Korea.
4
School of Chemical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: jtlee@ynu.ac.kr.

Abstract

The long-term usage of antibiotics has resulted in the evolution of multidrug resistant bacteria, and pathogenic biofilms contribute to reduced susceptibility to antibiotics. In this study, 83 essential oils were initially screened for biofilm inhibition against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Cinnamon bark oil and its main constituent cinnamaldehyde at 0.05% (v/v) markedly inhibited P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. Furthermore, cinnamon bark oil and eugenol decreased the production of pyocyanin and 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone, the swarming motility, and the hemolytic activity of P. aeruginosa. Also, cinnamon bark oil, cinnamaldehyde, and eugenol at 0.01% (v/v) significantly decreased biofilm formation of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC). Transcriptional analysis showed that cinnamon bark oil down-regulated curli genes and Shiga-like toxin gene stx2 in EHEC. In addition, biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) film incorporating biofilm inhibitors was fabricated and shown to provide efficient biofilm control on solid surfaces. This is the first report that cinnamon bark oil and its components, cinnamaldehyde and eugenol, reduce the production of pyocyanin and PQS, the swarming motility, and the hemolytic activity of P. aeruginosa, and inhibit EHEC biofilm formation.

KEYWORDS:

Biofilm formation; Cinnamaldehyde; Cinnamon bark oil; Eugenol; Hemolysis; Toxin production

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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