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Brachytherapy. 2015 Mar-Apr;14(2):197-201. doi: 10.1016/j.brachy.2014.11.004. Epub 2014 Dec 11.

Current state of brachytherapy teaching in Canada: a national survey of radiation oncologists, residents, and fellows.

Author information

1
Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Département de radio-oncologie, CSSS de Gatineau-Hôpital de Gatineau, Gatineau, Quebec, Canada; Canadian Brachytherapy Group. Electronic address: marcgaudet@ssss.gouv.qc.ca.
2
Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Centre, London, Ontario, Canada; Canadian Brachytherapy Group.
3
Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Canadian Brachytherapy Group.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The objective of the present study was to determine perceptions and barriers concerning brachytherapy (BT) teaching in Canada to guide the development of a BT credentialing process.

METHODS AND MATERIALS:

In May 2013, an electronic survey was sent to all radiation oncologists, program directors, residents, and fellows in Canada. Questions were asked regarding demographics, practice patterns, teaching methods and assessment, curriculum content, perceptions on resident education, and barriers to resident teaching.

RESULTS:

One hundred twenty-one staff radiation oncologists and 32 residents responded to the survey. Only 54% of respondents stated that their center had defined specific written objectives with respect to knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for a resident to be competent in BT. The main barriers to BT teaching were stated as being the lack of Royal College guidance (55%), heavy clinical workload (49%), lack of time (37%), and the fact that too much emphasis is placed on passing examinations (32%). Ninety-seven percent of respondents felt that it was important or very important that some elements of BT be included in the mainstream radiation oncology curriculum. Eighty percent of respondents were in agreement with the development of a formal credentialing process by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, which would lead to separate certification in BT.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results of this study show the importance of developing specific BT curriculum and emphasize the need for a credentialing process.

KEYWORDS:

Brachytherapy; Certification; Credential; Survey; Teaching

PMID:
25500133
DOI:
10.1016/j.brachy.2014.11.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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