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J Diabetes Complications. 2015 Mar;29(2):203-11. doi: 10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2014.11.010. Epub 2014 Nov 25.

Health-related quality of life in women and men with type 2 diabetes: a comparison across treatment groups.

Author information

1
Institute of Health Economics and Health Care Management, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health (GmbH), Neuherberg, Germany.
2
Institute for Community Medicine, Ernst Moritz Arndt-University, Greifswald, Germany.
3
Institute of Epidemiology II, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health (GmbH), Neuherberg, Germany.
4
Institute of Medical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Informatics, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Saale), Germany.
5
Institute of Medical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Informatics, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Saale), Germany; German Cancer Research Centre, Division of Cancer Epidemiology, Heidelberg, Germany.
6
Institute of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, University of Muenster, Muenster, Germany.
7
Department of Epidemiology and Health Reporting, Robert-Koch-Institute, Berlin, Germany.
8
Institute of Biometrics and Epidemiology, German Diabetes Center, Leibniz Center for Diabetes Research at Heinrich-Heine-University, Düsseldorf, Germany.

Abstract

AIM:

This study compares health-related quality of life (HRQL) in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) across treatment groups and explores gender differences.

METHODS:

Four regional surveys (KORA, CARLA, SHIP, DHS) and a national survey (GNHIES98) were pooled at individual level. HRQL was assessed with the SF-12/-36v1. Linear regression models were used to assess the effect of T2DM by treatment type (no medication; oral; oral/insulin combination; insulin) on the physical (PCS-12) and mental summary score (MCS-12) and the SF-6D, controlling for age, sex, study and covariates. We also performed an explanatory analysis of single items.

RESULTS:

PCS-12 scores and treatment type were associated (P-value 0.006), with lowest values for insulin treatment (-4.44 vs. oral; -4.41 vs. combination). MCS-12 scores were associated with treatment type and gender (P-value <0.012), with lower scores for women undergoing oral (-4.25 vs. men) and combination treatment (-6.99 vs. men). Similar results were observed for SF-6D utilities and single items, related to mental health, social functioning, vitality and role limitation (emotional). Comorbidities were predictors of lower PCS-12 and SF-6D scores.

CONCLUSIONS:

T2DM treatment impacts differently on physical and mental HRQL and on women and men. Further studies of gender-specific perceptions of T2DM treatment regimens are needed.

KEYWORDS:

Gender; HRQL; SF-12; T2DM; Treatment

PMID:
25499244
DOI:
10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2014.11.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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