Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Oral Oncol. 2015 Feb;51(2):139-45. doi: 10.1016/j.oraloncology.2014.11.008. Epub 2014 Dec 9.

Oral Candida colonization in oral cancer patients and its relationship with traditional risk factors of oral cancer: a matched case-control study.

Author information

1
Melbourne Dental School, Oral Health CRC, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Vic 3010, Australia.
2
Melbourne Dental School, Oral Health CRC, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Vic 3010, Australia; Head and Neck Oncology, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, Vic 3010, Australia.
3
Melbourne Dental School, Oral Health CRC, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Vic 3010, Australia. Electronic address: m.mccullough@unimelb.edu.au.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Candida, an opportunistic fungal pathogen, has been implicated in oral and oesophageal cancers. This study aimed to examine oral Candida carriage in 52 oral cancer patients and 104 age-, gender- and denture status-matched oral cancer-free subjects.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

We assessed general health, smoking and alcohol drinking habits, use of alcohol-containing mouthwash and periodontal status (community periodontal index of treatment needs). Yeasts were isolated using oral rinse technique and genetically identified via Real-Time PCR-High resolution melting curve analysis of conserved ribosomal DNA. Conditional and binary logistic regressions were used to identify explanatory variables that are risk factors for oral cancer.

RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:

The frequencies of oral yeasts' presence and high oral colonization were significantly higher in oral cancer than non-oral cancer patients (p=001; p=0.033, respectively). No significant difference in the isolation profile of Candida species was found between the two groups, except C. parapsilosis was more frequent in non-oral cancer group. Differences were noticed in the incidence of C. albicans strains where significantly more C. albicans genotype-A was isolated from cancer patients and significantly more C. albicans genotype-B isolated from non-cancer patients. Multiple regression analyses showed significant association with cancer observed for alcohol drinking (OR=4.253; 95% CI=1.351, 13.386), Candida presence (OR=3.242; 95% CI=1.505, 6.984) and high oral colonization (OR=3.587; 95% CI=1.153, 11.162). These results indicate that there is a significant association between oral cancer occurrence and Candida oral colonization and that the observed genotypic diversity of C. albicans strains may play a role in oral carcinogenesis.

KEYWORDS:

Acetaldehyde; Candida albicans; Case-controlled study; Oral cancer; Risk factors; Squamous cell carcinoma

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center