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Med J Aust. 2014 Dec 11;201(11):647-9.

Australian bat lyssavirus: implications for public health.

Author information

1
Department of Paediatrics, Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, NT, Australia. josh.francis@nt.gov.au.
2
Metro South Public Health Unit, Queensland Health, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
3
Darling Downs Public Health Unit, Queensland Health, Toowoomba, QLD, Australia.
4
Mater Health Services, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
5
Mater Pathology, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.

Abstract

Australian bat lyssavirus (ABLV) infection in humans is rare but fatal, with no proven effective therapy. ABLV infection can be prevented by administration of a post-exposure prophylaxis regimen of human rabies immunoglobulin and rabies vaccine. All Australian bats (flying foxes and microbats) should be considered to be carrying ABLV unless proven otherwise. Any bat-related injury (bite, scratch or mucosal exposure to bat saliva or neural tissue) should be notified immediately to the relevant public health unit - no matter how small the injury or how long ago it occurred. Human-to-human transmission of ABLV has not been reported but is theoretically possible. Standard infection control precautions should be employed when managing patients with suspected or confirmed ABLV infection.

PMID:
25495308
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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