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BMC Infect Dis. 2014 Dec 10;14:638. doi: 10.1186/s12879-014-0638-5.

Male Gender is independently associated with pulmonary tuberculosis among sputum and non-sputum producers people with presumptive tuberculosis in Southwestern Uganda.

Author information

1
Epicentre Mbarara, Mbarara, Uganda. yap.boum@epicentre.msf.org.
2
Mbarara University of Science and Technology, Mbarara, Uganda. yap.boum@epicentre.msf.org.
3
Epicentre Mbarara, Mbarara, Uganda. daniel.atwine@epicentre.msf.org.
4
Epicentre Mbarara, Mbarara, Uganda. patrick.orikiriza@epicentre.msf.org.
5
Uganda National Tuberculosis and Leprosy program, Mbarara, Uganda. asiimwejpk@yahoo.co.uk.
6
Epicentre, Paris, France. anne-laure.page@epicentre.msf.org.
7
Epicentre Mbarara, Mbarara, Uganda. juliet.mwanga@epicentre.msf.org.
8
Mbarara University of Science and Technology, Mbarara, Uganda. juliet.mwanga@epicentre.msf.org.
9
Epicentre, Paris, France. maryline.bonnet@epicentre.msf.org.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Little is known about the association between gender and risk of TB infection. We sought to assess the impact of gender on TB prevalence among people with presumptive tuberculosis at a regional referral hospital in a high TB and HIV prevalence setting.

METHODS:

We analyzed data from two diagnostic TB studies conducted in rural, southwestern Uganda. People with presumptive tuberculosis were evaluated by chest X-ray, fluorescence microscopy, TB culture, and HIV testing. Our primary outcome of interest was TB infection, as defined by a positive TB culture. Our primary explanatory variable of interest was gender. We fit univariable and multivariable logistic regression models to investigate associations between TB infection and gender, before and after adjusting or possible confounding factors, including ability to produce sputum, age and residence.

RESULTS:

Between April 2010 and September 2012, 863 people with presumptive tuberculosis (PWPTB) were enrolled in the two studies at Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital (MRRH) in Uganda. Among them 664 (76.9%) were able to produce sputum. X-ray was suggestive of TB for 258 (66.5%) of males and 175 (44.8%) of female (p < 0.001). using microscopy 84 (20%) of males and 48 (10.9%) of females were diagnosed with TB (p < 0.001) while 122 (30.3%) of males and 76 (18.4%) of females were diagnosed with TB (p < 0.001) using TB culture. In multivariable logistic regression models, the odds of having TB was higher in males than females (AOR 2.2 (1.56-3.18 95% CI°, P < 0.001), after adjustment for age, HIV status, ability to produce sputum, and residence.

CONCLUSION:

In Southwestern Uganda, TB prevalence is higher among male than female people with presumptive TB. The increased risk of TB among males is independent of other TB risk factors. These findings emphasize the need for gender-focused interventions aimed at reducing TB transmission.

PMID:
25492725
PMCID:
PMC4265338
DOI:
10.1186/s12879-014-0638-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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