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J Craniofac Surg. 2015 Jan;26(1):277-80. doi: 10.1097/SCS.0000000000001201.

The effect of coenzyme Q10 on the regeneration of crushed facial nerve.

Author information

1
From the Departments of *Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and †Pathology, Okmeydanı Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study is to show the possible positive effect of coenzyme Q10 (Co Q10) on regenerating in facial palsy.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Sixteen female Sprague-Dawley albino rats were randomly divided into 2 groups as Co Q10 and control groups. Group Q10 (n = 8) received Co Q10 of 10 mg/kg/d intraperitoneally for 30 days, and group C (n = 8) received saline solution of 1 mL/d intraperitoneally once daily for 30 days. The right facial nerve stimulation thresholds were determined before crush, immediately after crush, and after 1 month.After determination of the thresholds, the crushed part of the facial nerve was then excised. All specimens were examined by a pathologist using a light microscope.

RESULTS:

No statistically significant difference in stimulation threshold was found between the Co Q10 and saline groups after crushing (P = 0.645). After 1 month of treatment, stimulation thresholds were significantly lower in both the Co Q10 and saline groups (Ps = 0.028 and 0.016). However, the Co Q10 group showed greater improvement than the saline group (P = 0.050).After 1 month of treatment, neither the Co Q10 group nor the saline group had reached the precrushing amplitude levels (Ps = 0.027 and 0.011).Significant differences were found in vascular congestion, macrovacuolization, and myelin thickness between the Co Q10 and control groups by light microscopy (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Although many treatment methods have been tried to accelerate facial nerve regeneration after trauma, a definitive method has not been found yet. Co Q for the treatment of acute facial paralysis is promising on both physiologic assessments and pathologic evaluation.

PMID:
25490571
DOI:
10.1097/SCS.0000000000001201
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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