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Adv Drug Deliv Rev. 2015 Mar;82-83:192-6. doi: 10.1016/j.addr.2014.12.001. Epub 2014 Dec 7.

From bench to FDA to bedside: US regulatory trends for new stem cell therapies.

Author information

1
Department of Cell Biology and Human Anatomy, University of California Davis School of Medicine, 4303 Tupper Hall, Davis, CA 95616, USA; Genome Center, University of California Davis School of Medicine, 451 Health Sciences Drive, Davis, CA 95616, USA; Institute of Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Shriners Hospital For Children Northern California, 2425 Stockton Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95817, USA. Electronic address: knoepfler@ucdavis.edu.

Abstract

The phrase "bench-to-bedside" is commonly used to describe the translation of basic discoveries such as those on stem cells to the clinic for therapeutic use in human patients. However, there is a key intermediate step in between the bench and the bedside involving governmental regulatory oversight such as by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States (US). Thus, it might be more accurate in most cases to describe the stem cell biological drug development process in this way: from bench to FDA to bedside. The intermediate development and regulatory stage for stem cell-based biological drugs is a multifactorial, continually evolving part of the process of developing a biological drug such as a stem cell-based regenerative medicine product. In some situations, stem cell-related products may not be classified as biological drugs in which case the FDA plays a relatively minor role. However, this middle stage is generally a major element of the process and is often colloquially referred to in an ominous way as "The Valley of Death". This moniker seems appropriate because it is at this point, and in particular in the work that ensues after Phase 1, clinical trials that most drug product development is terminated, often due to lack of funding, diseases being refractory to treatment, or regulatory issues. Not surprisingly, workarounds to deal with or entirely avoid this difficult stage of the process are evolving both inside and outside the domains of official regulatory authorities. In some cases these efforts involve the FDA invoking new mechanisms of accelerating the bench to beside process, but in other cases these new pathways bypass the FDA in part or entirely. Together these rapidly changing stem cell product development and regulatory pathways raise many scientific, ethical, and medical questions. These emerging trends and their potential consequences are reviewed here.

KEYWORDS:

Compassionate use; FDA; Homologous use; Regenerative medicine; Right to try laws; Stem cell treatments; Stem cells

PMID:
25489841
PMCID:
PMC4398607
DOI:
10.1016/j.addr.2014.12.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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