Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Heart. 2015 May 15;101(10):766-73. doi: 10.1136/heartjnl-2014-306750. Epub 2014 Dec 8.

Cardiorespiratory fitness and ideal cardiovascular health in European adolescents.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Education and Sports, Faculty of Sport Sciences, PROmoting FITness and Health through physical activity research group (PROFIT), University of Granada, Granada, Andalucia, Spain Department of Biosciences and Nutrition at NOVUM, Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
2
Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC/WHO), Lyon, France.
3
Department of Medical Physiology, School of Medicine, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
4
Department of Education, Area of Physical Education and Sport, University of Almería, Almería, Spain.
5
Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of the Basque Country, UPV/EHU, Vitoria, Spain.
6
Inserm, UMR744; Institut Pasteur de Lille; Lille, Univ Lille Nord de France, Lille; UDSL, Lille, France.
7
GENUD "Growth, Exercise, NUtrition and Development" Research Group, Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain Faculty of Health and Sport Science (FCSD), Department of Physiatry and Nursing, Universidad de Zaragoza, Ronda Misericordia 5, 22001-Huesca, Spain.
8
Agricultural Research Council-Research Center on Food and Nutrition-(C.R.A. NUT formerly INRAN), Rome, Italy.
9
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Harokopio University, Athens, Greece.
10
ImFine Research Group. Facultad de Ciencias de la Actividad Física y del Deporte-INEF, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid, Spain CIBER: CB12/03/30038 Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y la Nutrición, CIBERobn, Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII), Spain.
11
Immunonutrition Research Group, Department of Metabolism and Nutrition, Instituto del Frio, Institute of Food Science, Technology and Nutrition, Spanish National Research Council, Madrid, Spain.
12
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Clinical Nutrition, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
13
Department of Pediatrics, University of Pecs, Pecs, Hungary.
14
Preventive Medicine and Nutrition Unit, School of Medicine, University of Crete, Crete, Greece.
15
Department of Biosciences and Nutrition at NOVUM, Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
16
GENUD "Growth, Exercise, NUtrition and Development" Research Group, Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We studied in European adolescents (i) the association between cardiorespiratory fitness and ideal cardiovascular health as defined by the American Heart Association and (ii) whether there is a cardiorespiratory fitness threshold associated with a more favourable cardiovascular health profile.

METHODS:

Participants included 510 (n=259 girls) adolescents from 9 European countries. The 20 m shuttle run test was used to estimate cardiorespiratory fitness. Ideal cardiovascular health was defined as meeting ideal levels of the following components: four behaviours (smoking, body mass index, physical activity and diet) and three factors (total cholesterol, blood pressure and glucose).

RESULTS:

Higher levels of cardiorespiratory fitness were associated with a higher number of ideal cardiovascular health components in both boys and girls (both p for trend ≤0.001). Levels of cardiorespiratory fitness were significantly higher in adolescents meeting at least four ideal components (13% higher in boys, p<0.001; 6% higher in girls, p=0.008). Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses showed a significant discriminating accuracy of cardiorespiratory fitness in identifying the presence of at least four ideal cardiovascular health components (43.8 mL/kg/min in boys and 34.6 mL/kg/min in girls, both p<0.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

The results suggest a hypothetical cardiorespiratory fitness level associated with a healthier cardiovascular profile in adolescents. The fitness standards could be used in schools as part of surveillance and/or screening systems to identify youth with poor health behaviours who might benefit from intervention programmes.

PMID:
25489050
DOI:
10.1136/heartjnl-2014-306750
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire
Loading ...
Support Center