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Circulation. 2015 Jan 20;131(3):289-99. doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.114.010403. Epub 2014 Dec 8.

Strategy for identifying repurposed drugs for the treatment of cerebral cavernous malformation.

Author information

1
From the Program in Molecular Medicine (C.C.G., W.Z., C.T.D., J.A.B.-K., A.C.C., J.L., A.H.G., K.R.T., K.J.W., D.Y.L.), Department of Bioengineering (C.C.G., Y.-T.E.S.), Department of Medicine (C.C.G., W.Z., K.R.T., D.Y.L.), Department of Human Genetics (C.T.D.), Department of Oncological Sciences (A.C.C., D.Y.L.), Division of Geriatrics, Department of Medicine (A.E.W., A.J.D., L.A.L.), Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Department of Medicine (Y.-T.E.S.), Department of Pathology (A.H.G.), Division of Cardiology, and Department of Medicine (K.J.W., D.Y.L.), University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT; Recursion Pharmaceuticals, LLC, Salt Lake City, UT (C.C.G., D.Y.L.); CCM Italia, Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Torino, Orbassano, Torino, Italy (L.G., S.F.R.); CCM Italia, Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Sciences, University of L'Aquila, L'Aquila, Italy (S.D.M.); Geriatrics Research Education and Clinical Center, Veteran's Affairs Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (A.J.D., L.A.L.); The Key Laboratory for Human Disease Gene Study of Sichuan Province, Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Sichuan Academy of Medical Sciences & Sichuan Provincial People's Hospital, Chengdu, Sichuan, China (D.Y.L.); and Cardiology Section, VA Salt Lake City Health Care System, Salt Lake City, UT (K.J.W., O.Y.L.).
2
From the Program in Molecular Medicine (C.C.G., W.Z., C.T.D., J.A.B.-K., A.C.C., J.L., A.H.G., K.R.T., K.J.W., D.Y.L.), Department of Bioengineering (C.C.G., Y.-T.E.S.), Department of Medicine (C.C.G., W.Z., K.R.T., D.Y.L.), Department of Human Genetics (C.T.D.), Department of Oncological Sciences (A.C.C., D.Y.L.), Division of Geriatrics, Department of Medicine (A.E.W., A.J.D., L.A.L.), Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Department of Medicine (Y.-T.E.S.), Department of Pathology (A.H.G.), Division of Cardiology, and Department of Medicine (K.J.W., D.Y.L.), University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT; Recursion Pharmaceuticals, LLC, Salt Lake City, UT (C.C.G., D.Y.L.); CCM Italia, Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Torino, Orbassano, Torino, Italy (L.G., S.F.R.); CCM Italia, Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Sciences, University of L'Aquila, L'Aquila, Italy (S.D.M.); Geriatrics Research Education and Clinical Center, Veteran's Affairs Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (A.J.D., L.A.L.); The Key Laboratory for Human Disease Gene Study of Sichuan Province, Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Sichuan Academy of Medical Sciences & Sichuan Provincial People's Hospital, Chengdu, Sichuan, China (D.Y.L.); and Cardiology Section, VA Salt Lake City Health Care System, Salt Lake City, UT (K.J.W., O.Y.L.). dean.li@u2m2.utah.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) is a hemorrhagic stroke disease affecting up to 0.5% of North Americans that has no approved nonsurgical treatment. A subset of patients have a hereditary form of the disease due primarily to loss-of-function mutations in KRIT1, CCM2, or PDCD10. We sought to identify known drugs that could be repurposed to treat CCM.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

We developed an unbiased screening platform based on both cellular and animal models of loss of function of CCM2. Our discovery strategy consisted of 4 steps: an automated immunofluorescence and machine-learning-based primary screen of structural phenotypes in human endothelial cells deficient in CCM2, a secondary screen of functional changes in endothelial stability in these same cells, a rapid in vivo tertiary screen of dermal microvascular leak in mice lacking endothelial Ccm2, and finally a quaternary screen of CCM lesion burden in these same mice. We screened 2100 known drugs and bioactive compounds and identified 2 candidates, cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) and tempol (a scavenger of superoxide), for further study. Each drug decreased lesion burden in a mouse model of CCM vascular disease by ≈50%.

CONCLUSIONS:

By identifying known drugs as potential therapeutics for CCM, we have decreased the time, cost, and risk of bringing treatments to patients. Each drug also prompts additional exploration of biomarkers of CCM disease. We further suggest that the structure-function screening platform presented here may be adapted and scaled to facilitate drug discovery for diverse loss-of-function genetic vascular disease.

KEYWORDS:

cerebrovascular disorders; endothelium; genetics; hemorrhage; stroke

PMID:
25486933
PMCID:
PMC4356181
DOI:
10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.114.010403
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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