Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Neuroimage. 2015 Feb 15;107:55-64. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2014.11.058. Epub 2014 Dec 5.

Partial volume correction in quantitative amyloid imaging.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA. Electronic address: suy@mir.wustl.edu.
2
Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA.
3
Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA; Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA.
4
Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA.
5
Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA.
6
Department of Neurology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA.
7
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA.
8
Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA.
9
Imaging Genetics Center, Institute for Neuroimaging and Informatics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90032, USA; Department of Neurology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90032, USA; Department of Psychiatry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90032, USA; Department of Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90032, USA; Department of Radiology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90032, USA; Department of Pediatrics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90032, USA; Department of Ophthalmology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90032, USA.
10
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA.
11
Center for Neuroimaging, Department of Radiology and Imaging Science, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA.
12
Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
13
Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
14
Neuroscience Research Australia, Sydney, NSW 2031, Australia; School of Medical Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia.

Abstract

Amyloid imaging is a valuable tool for research and diagnosis in dementing disorders. As positron emission tomography (PET) scanners have limited spatial resolution, measured signals are distorted by partial volume effects. Various techniques have been proposed for correcting partial volume effects, but there is no consensus as to whether these techniques are necessary in amyloid imaging, and, if so, how they should be implemented. We evaluated a two-component partial volume correction technique and a regional spread function technique using both simulated and human Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) PET imaging data. Both correction techniques compensated for partial volume effects and yielded improved detection of subtle changes in PiB retention. However, the regional spread function technique was more accurate in application to simulated data. Because PiB retention estimates depend on the correction technique, standardization is necessary to compare results across groups. Partial volume correction has sometimes been avoided because it increases the sensitivity to inaccuracy in image registration and segmentation. However, our results indicate that appropriate PVC may enhance our ability to detect changes in amyloid deposition.

KEYWORDS:

Amyloid imaging; PET; Partial volume correction; PiB

PMID:
25485714
PMCID:
PMC4300252
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuroimage.2014.11.058
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center