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Acta Biomater. 2015 Feb;13:16-31. doi: 10.1016/j.actbio.2014.11.048. Epub 2014 Dec 4.

Mg and Mg alloys: how comparable are in vitro and in vivo corrosion rates? A review.

Author information

1
Institute of Materials Research, Department for Structural Research on Macromolecules, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht (HZG), Geesthacht, Germany. Electronic address: adela.martinez@hzg.de.
2
Institute of Materials Research, Department for Structural Research on Macromolecules, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht (HZG), Geesthacht, Germany.

Abstract

Due to their biodegradability, magnesium and magnesium-based alloys could represent the third generation of biomaterials. However, their mechanical properties and time of degradation have to match the needs of applications. Several approaches, such as choice of alloying elements or tailored microstructure, are employed to tailor corrosion behaviour. Due to the high electrochemical activity of Mg, numerous environmental factors (e.g. temperature and surrounding ion composition) influence its corrosion behaviour, making it unpredictable. Nevertheless, the need of reliable in vitro model(s) to predict in vivo implant degradation is increasing. In an attempt to find a correlation between in vitro and vivo corrosion rates, this review presents a systematic literature survey, as well as an attempt to correlate the different results.

KEYWORDS:

Biodegradable metallic implants; Biomaterials; In vitro and in vivo corrosion; Magnesium alloys; Orthopaedics

PMID:
25484334
DOI:
10.1016/j.actbio.2014.11.048
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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