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Public Health Nutr. 2015 Jul;18(10):1839-46. doi: 10.1017/S136898001400281X. Epub 2014 Dec 8.

BMI and all-cause mortality among middle-aged and older adults in Taiwan: a population-based cohort study.

Author information

1
1Department of Internal Medicine,Taichung Hospital,Ministry of Health and Welfare,No. 199,Sec. 1,San-Min Road,Taichung City 40343,Taichung,Taiwan.
2
3Department of Internal Medicine,Taoyuan Hospital,Ministry of Health and Welfare,Taoyuan,Taiwan.
3
4Department of Family Medicine,Taichung Hospital,Ministry of Health and Welfare,Taichung,Taiwan.
4
5School of Public Health,Chung-Shan Medical University,Room 1237,No. 110,Sec. 1,Jianguo N. Road,Taichung City 40201,Taiwan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The present study investigates the relationship between BMI and all-cause mortality among middle-aged and older adults with or without pre-existing diseases.

DESIGN:

A population-based cohort study.

SETTING:

The Taiwan Longitudinal Study on Aging is a nationwide prospective cohort study comprising a representative random sample of middle-aged and older adults. The study period was 1996-2007.

SUBJECTS:

We followed 4145 middle-aged and older adults, totalling 42,353 person-years.

RESULTS:

Overweight and mildly obese participants showed a 16% and 30% decrease in the risk of death, respectively, compared with those of normal weight after adjusting for potential covariates (e.g. demographic characteristics, health behaviour, co-morbidities and physical function). Underweight adults showed a 1.36-fold increased adjusted hazard ratio of death compared with normal-weight adults. Adults with a BMI of 27.0-28.0 kg/m(2) showed a significantly lower adjusted hazard ratio of all-cause mortality rate compared with adults who had normal BMI values when they had coexisting hypertension or diabetes (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.50; 95% CI 0.30, 0.81 for hypertension and adjusted hazard ratio=0.41; 95% CI 0.18, 0.89 for diabetes).

CONCLUSIONS:

The study demonstrates that underweight people have a higher risk of death, and overweight and mildly obese people have a lower risk of death, compared with people of normal weight among middle-aged and older adults. An optimal BMI may be based on the individual, who exhibits pre-existing diseases or not.

KEYWORDS:

BMI; Middle-aged and older adults; Mortality; Prospective cohort study

PMID:
25482035
DOI:
10.1017/S136898001400281X
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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