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Neuron. 2014 Dec 17;84(6):1170-82. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2014.11.010. Epub 2014 Dec 4.

Wireless neurosensor for full-spectrum electrophysiology recordings during free behavior.

Author information

1
School of Engineering, Brown University, 184 Hope Street, Providence, RI 02912, USA.
2
School of Engineering, Brown University, 184 Hope Street, Providence, RI 02912, USA; Center for Neuroprosthetics, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Lausanne, CH-1015 Vaud, Switzerland.
3
Marvell Semiconductor, 5488 Marvell Lane, Santa Clara, CA 95054, USA.
4
Center for Neuroprosthetics, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Lausanne, CH-1015 Vaud, Switzerland.
5
Institute of Neurodegenerative diseases, Bordeaux Institut of Neuroscience, 146 Rue Léo Saignat, UMR, 33076 Bordeaux, France.
6
Motac Neuroscience, Lloyd Street N., Manchester, M15 6SE, UK; Institute of Laboratory Animal Sciences, China Academy of Medical Sciences, NO. 9, Dongdan san tiao, Dongcheng District, 100730 Beijing, China.
7
School of Engineering, Brown University, 184 Hope Street, Providence, RI 02912, USA; Center for Neurorestoration and Neurotechnology, Rehabilitation R&D Service, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 830 Chalkstone Avenue, Providence, RI 02908, USA.
8
Institute of Neurodegenerative diseases, Bordeaux Institut of Neuroscience, 146 Rue Léo Saignat, UMR, 33076 Bordeaux, France; Institute of Laboratory Animal Sciences, China Academy of Medical Sciences, NO. 9, Dongdan san tiao, Dongcheng District, 100730 Beijing, China.
9
School of Engineering, Brown University, 184 Hope Street, Providence, RI 02912, USA. Electronic address: arto_nurmikko@brown.edu.

Abstract

Brain recordings in large animal models and humans typically rely on a tethered connection, which has restricted the spectrum of accessible experimental and clinical applications. To overcome this limitation, we have engineered a compact, lightweight, high data rate wireless neurosensor capable of recording the full spectrum of electrophysiological signals from the cortex of mobile subjects. The wireless communication system exploits a spatially distributed network of synchronized receivers that is scalable to hundreds of channels and vast environments. To demonstrate the versatility of our wireless neurosensor, we monitored cortical neuron populations in freely behaving nonhuman primates during natural locomotion and sleep-wake transitions in ecologically equivalent settings. The interface is electrically safe and compatible with the majority of existing neural probes, which may support previously inaccessible experimental and clinical research.

PMID:
25482026
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2014.11.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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