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Biochim Biophys Acta. 2015 Jul;1849(7):861-70. doi: 10.1016/j.bbagrm.2014.11.009. Epub 2014 Dec 5.

Stress granules, P-bodies and cancer.

Author information

1
Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address: panderson@rics.bwh.harvard.edu.
2
Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
3
Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address: pivanov@rics.bwh.harvard.edu.

Abstract

Cancer cells are exposed to adverse conditions in the tumor microenvironment, and utilize post-transcriptional control mechanisms to re-program gene expression in ways that enhance cell survival. Stress granules and processing bodies are RNA-containing granules that contribute to this process by modulating cellular signaling pathways, metabolic machinery, and stress response programs. This review examines evidence implicating RNA granules in the pathogenesis of cancer and discusses their potential as targets for anticancer therapies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Translation and Cancer.

KEYWORDS:

Apoptosis; Cancer; P-body; Post-transcriptional regulation; Stress granule; Stress response

PMID:
25482014
PMCID:
PMC4457708
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbagrm.2014.11.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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