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Brain Res. 2015 Feb 9;1597:47-56. doi: 10.1016/j.brainres.2014.11.047. Epub 2014 Dec 4.

Functional MRI evidence for fine motor praxis dysfunction in children with persistent speech disorders.

Author information

1
Communication Sciences Research Center & the Division of Speech Pathology, Cincinnati Children׳s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Ave., MLC 15008, Cincinnati, OH, United States 45229-3039. Electronic address: Erin.redle@cchmc.org.
2
Pediatric Neuroimaging Research Consortium, Cincinnati Children׳s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Ave., MLC 5033, Cincinnati, OH, United States 45229-3039; (513)636-6959. Electronic address: Jennifer.vannest@cchmc.org.
3
Pediatric Neuroimaging Research Consortium, Cincinnati Children׳s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Ave., MLC 5033, Cincinnati, OH, United States 45229-3039; (513)636-6959.
4
Communication Sciences Research Center & the Division of Speech Pathology, Cincinnati Children׳s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Ave., MLC 15008, Cincinnati, OH, United States 45229-3039.
5
Communication Sciences, Case Western Reserve University, 11635 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH, United States 44106.
6
Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Highland Ave, Madison, WI, United States 53705.
7
Imaging Research Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati Children׳s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Ave., MLC 5033, Cincinnati, OH, United States 45229-3039.

Abstract

Children with persistent speech disorders (PSD) often present with overt or subtle motor deficits; the possibility that speech disorders and motor deficits could arise from a shared neurological base is currently unknown. Functional MRI (fMRI) was used to examine the brain networks supporting fine motor praxis in children with PSD and without clinically identified fine motor deficits.

METHODS:

This case-control study included 12 children with PSD (mean age 7.42 years, four female) and 12 controls (mean age 7.44 years, four female). Children completed behavioral evaluations using standardized motor assessments and parent reported functional measures. During fMRI scanning, participants completed a cued finger tapping task contrasted passive listening. A general linear model approach identified brain regions associated with finger tapping in each group and regions that differed between groups. The relationship between regional fMRI activation and fine motor skill was assessed using a regression analysis.

RESULTS:

Children with PSD had significantly poorer results for rapid speech production and fine motor praxis skills, but did not differ on classroom functional skills. Functional MRI results showed that children with PSD had significantly more activation in the cerebellum during finger tapping. Positive correlations between performance on a fine motor praxis test and activation multiple cortical regions were noted for children with PSD but not for controls.

CONCLUSIONS:

Over-activation in the cerebellum during a motor task may reflect a subtle abnormality in the non-speech motor neural circuitry in children with PSD.

KEYWORDS:

Fine motor praxis; Finger tapping; Sound disorders; fMRI

PMID:
25481413
PMCID:
PMC4340817
DOI:
10.1016/j.brainres.2014.11.047
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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