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Clin Res Hepatol Gastroenterol. 2015 Feb;39(1):9-19. doi: 10.1016/j.clinre.2014.10.008. Epub 2014 Nov 11.

The interplay between the intestinal microbiota and the immune system.

Author information

1
Section of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, The University of Chicago, 924 E, 57th Street, 60637 Chicago, Illinois, USA.
2
Section of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, The University of Chicago, 924 E, 57th Street, 60637 Chicago, Illinois, USA. Electronic address: malegre@midway.uchicago.edu.

Abstract

The relationship between commensal microbes and their hosts has been studied for many years. Commensal microorganisms are known to have a significant role in regulating the physiology of their hosts and preventing pathogenic infections while the hosts' immune system is important in determining the composition of the microbiota. More recently, specific effects of the intestinal microbiota on the local and distal immune systems have been uncovered with important consequences for health and disease, and alterations in intestinal microbial composition has been associated with various disease states. Here, we will review the current understanding of the microbiota/immune system crosstalk, highlight the clinical consequences of changes in the microbiota and consider how to harness this symbiotic relationship to improve public health.

PMID:
25481240
PMCID:
PMC4423786
DOI:
10.1016/j.clinre.2014.10.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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