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Appl Ergon. 2015 Mar;47:1-10. doi: 10.1016/j.apergo.2014.08.007. Epub 2014 Sep 19.

Risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome related to the work organization: a prospective surveillance study in a large working population.

Author information

1
LUNAM Université, Université d'Angers, Laboratoire d'ergonomie et d'épidémiologie en santé au travail (LEEST), Angers, France. Electronic address: aupetit@chu-angers.fr.
2
Département santé travail, Institut de veille sanitaire (DST-InVS), Saint-Maurice, France.
3
LUNAM Université, Université d'Angers, Laboratoire d'ergonomie et d'épidémiologie en santé au travail (LEEST), Angers, France.
4
INSERM, Université de Versailles St-Quentin, UMS 011, Population-Based Epidemiological Cohorts Unit, Villejuif, France.

Abstract

The study aimed to determine the risk factors for incident carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in a large working population, with a special focus on factors related to work organization. In 2002-2005, 3710 workers were assessed and, in 2007-2010, 1611 were re-examined. At baseline all completed a self-administered questionnaire about personal/medical factors and work exposure. CTS symptoms and physical examination signs were assessed by a standardized medical examination at baseline and follow-up. The risk of "symptomatic CTS" was higher for women (OR = 2.9 [1.7-5.2]) and increased linearly with age (OR = 1.04 [1.00-1.07] for 1-year increment). Two work organizational factors remained in the multivariate risk model after adjustment for the personal/medical and biomechanical factors: payment on a piecework basis (OR = 2.0, 95% CI 1.1-3.5) and work pace dependent on automatic rate (OR = 1.9, 95% CI 0.9-4.1). Several factors related to work organization were associated with incident CTS after adjustment for potential confounders.

KEYWORDS:

Carpal tunnel syndrome; Psychosocial factors; Work organization

PMID:
25479968
DOI:
10.1016/j.apergo.2014.08.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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