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Contemp Clin Trials. 2015 Jan;40:138-49. doi: 10.1016/j.cct.2014.11.018. Epub 2014 Dec 3.

Bounce Back Now! Protocol of a population-based randomized controlled trial to examine the efficacy of a Web-based intervention with disaster-affected families.

Author information

1
Technology Applications Center for Healthful Lifestyles, College of Nursing, Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), Charleston, SC, United States; Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 109 Bee Street, Charleston, SC, 29401, United States. Electronic address: ruggierk@musc.edu.
2
Technology Applications Center for Healthful Lifestyles, College of Nursing, Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), Charleston, SC, United States; National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, MUSC, Charleston, SC, United States.
3
Clinical Neuroscience Division, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, MUSC, Charleston, SC, United States.
4
Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 109 Bee Street, Charleston, SC, 29401, United States.
5
Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 109 Bee Street, Charleston, SC, 29401, United States; National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, MUSC, Charleston, SC, United States.
6
Center for Research on Emotion, Stress, and Technology, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, United States.
7
National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, MUSC, Charleston, SC, United States.
8
Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY, United States.
9
Fuzzco, Inc., 95 Cannon Street, Charleston, SC, United States.
10
Technology Applications Center for Healthful Lifestyles, College of Nursing, Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), Charleston, SC, United States; Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 109 Bee Street, Charleston, SC, 29401, United States.
11
Abt SRBI, 275 Seventh Avenue, Ste. 2700, New York, NY, United States.
12
Department of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Human and Molecular Genetics, Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, United States.

Abstract

Disasters have far-reaching and potentially long-lasting effects on youth and families. Research has consistently shown a clear increase in the prevalence of several mental health disorders after disasters, including depression and posttraumatic stress disorder. Widely accessible evidence-based interventions are needed to address this unmet need for youth and families, who are underrepresented in disaster research. Rapid growth in Internet and Smartphone access, as well as several Web based evaluation studies with various adult populations has shown that Web-based interventions are likely to be feasible in this context and can improve clinical outcomes. Such interventions also are generally cost-effective, can be targeted or personalized, and can easily be integrated in a stepped care approach to screening and intervention delivery. This is a protocol paper that describes an innovative study design in which we evaluate a self-help Web-based resource, Bounce Back Now, with a population-based sample of disaster affected adolescents and families. The paper includes description and justification for sampling selection and procedures, selection of assessment measures and methods, design of the intervention, and statistical evaluation of critical outcomes. Unique features of this study design include the use of address-based sampling to recruit a population-based sample of disaster-affected adolescents and parents, telephone and Web-based assessments, and development and evaluation of a highly individualized Web intervention for adolescents. Challenges related to large-scale evaluation of technology-delivered interventions with high-risk samples in time-sensitive research are discussed, as well as implications for future research and practice.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescents; Disaster mental health; Population-based research; Web intervention

PMID:
25478956
PMCID:
PMC4314324
DOI:
10.1016/j.cct.2014.11.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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