Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Front Psychol. 2014 Nov 19;5:1329. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2014.01329. eCollection 2014.

Working memory for time intervals in auditory rhythmic sequences.

Author information

1
Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London London, UK ; Auditory Cognition Group, Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University Newcastle upon Tyne, UK ; Laboratoire des Systemes Perceptifs, CNRS UMR 8248, Departement d'Etudes Cognitives Ecole Normale Superiere, Paris, France.
2
Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London London, UK ; Auditory Cognition Group, Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

Abstract

The brain can hold information about multiple objects in working memory. It is not known, however, whether intervals of time can be stored in memory as distinct items. Here, we developed a novel paradigm to examine temporal memory where listeners were required to reproduce the duration of a single probed interval from a sequence of intervals. We demonstrate that memory performance significantly varies as a function of temporal structure (better memory in regular vs. irregular sequences), interval size (better memory for sub- vs. supra-second intervals), and memory load (poor memory for higher load). In contrast memory performance is invariant to attentional cueing. Our data represent the first systematic investigation of temporal memory in sequences that goes beyond previous work based on single intervals. The results support the emerging hypothesis that time intervals are allocated a working memory resource that varies with the amount of other temporal information in a sequence.

KEYWORDS:

auditory perception; interval timing; rhythm perception; time perception; working memory

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Frontiers Media SA Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center