Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Food Sci Technol. 2014 Dec;51(12):3669-79. doi: 10.1007/s13197-012-0915-5. Epub 2013 Jan 10.

Physicochemical properties of flours and starches derived from traditional Indonesian tubers and roots.

Author information

1
School of Biomedical and Health Science, Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science, Victoria University, Werribee Campus, Melbourne, Victoria Australia.
2
School of Biomedical and Health Science, Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science, Victoria University, Werribee Campus, Melbourne, Victoria Australia ; Institute for Sustainability and Innovation, Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science, Victoria University, Werribee Campus, Melbourne, Victoria Australia.
3
School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, City Campus, Melbourne, Victoria Australia.

Abstract

Flours and starches isolated from traditional tubers and roots grown in Indonesia have physical and chemical properties suitable for certain food applications. Compared to other flour samples, cassava and canna flours contained the highest amount of total starch (TS) (77.4 and 77.1 %, respectively). Taro starch had the lowest amount of TS among other starch samples with 75.4 %. The highest amount of amylose was observed from yam and canna flours (25.2 and 23.2 %, respectively). Among starch samples, canna starch contained the highest amylose content (30.4 %), while taro had the lowest (7.6 %). In terms of protein content, arrowroot flour had the highest amount (7.7 %), in contrast to cassava flour which had the lowest (1.5 %). Compared to other flours, canna and konjac flour were the most slowly digested which indicated by their high amount of resistant starch (RS). Canna starch had the highest swelling power and viscosity than other starches and flours. The clearest paste was observed from cassava flour and starch as opposed to konjac starch which was the most opaque paste.

KEYWORDS:

Arrowroot; Canna; Cassava; Flour; Konjak; Physico-chemical properties; Starch; Sweet potato; Taro; Yam

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center