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Stroke. 2015 Jan;46(1):58-64. doi: 10.1161/STROKEAHA.114.006653. Epub 2014 Dec 4.

Cost-effectiveness of transfers to centers with neurological intensive care units after intracerebral hemorrhage.

Author information

1
From the Departments of Neurosurgery (J.J.F., L.B.M.), Neurology (V.K., A.M.), Biostatistics (L.B.M.), Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (M.P.), and the Stroke Program (L.B.M., J.F.B.), University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; and Department of Neurology, Bronson Methodist Hospital, Kalamazoo, MI (J.J.F.). fletchje@bronsonhg.org.
2
From the Departments of Neurosurgery (J.J.F., L.B.M.), Neurology (V.K., A.M.), Biostatistics (L.B.M.), Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (M.P.), and the Stroke Program (L.B.M., J.F.B.), University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; and Department of Neurology, Bronson Methodist Hospital, Kalamazoo, MI (J.J.F.).

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

Our aim was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of transferring patients with intracerebral hemorrhage from centers without specialized neurological intensive care units (neuro-ICUs) to centers with neuro-ICUs.

METHODS:

Decision analytic models were developed for the lifetime horizons. Model inputs were derived from the best available data, informed by a variety of previous cost-effectiveness models of stroke. The effect of neuro-ICU care on functional outcomes was modeled in 3 scenarios. A favorable outcomes scenario was modeled based on the best observational data and compared with moderately favorable and least-favorable outcomes scenarios. Health benefits were measured in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and costs were estimated from a societal perspective. Costs were combined with QALYs gained to generate incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. One-way sensitivity analysis and Monte Carlo simulations were performed to test robustness of the model assumptions.

RESULTS:

Transferring patients to centers with neuro-ICUs yielded an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for the lifetime horizon of $47,431 per QALY, $91,674 per QALY, and $380,358 per QALY for favorable, moderately favorable, and least-favorable scenarios, respectively. Models were robust at a willingness-to-pay threshold of $100,000 per QALY, with 95.5%, 75.0%, and 2.1% of simulations below the threshold for favorable, moderately favorable, and least-favorable scenarios, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

Transferring patients with intracerebral hemorrhage to centers with specialized neuro-ICUs is cost-effective if observational estimates of the neuro-ICU-based functional outcome distribution are accurate. If future work confirms these functional outcome distributions, then a strong societal rationale exists to build systems of care designed to transfer intracerebral hemorrhage patients to specialized neuro-ICUs.

KEYWORDS:

cerebral hemorrhage; cost-effectiveness; mortality

PMID:
25477220
PMCID:
PMC4276522
DOI:
10.1161/STROKEAHA.114.006653
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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