Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Perinatol. 2015 May;35(5):373-8. doi: 10.1038/jp.2014.217. Epub 2014 Dec 4.

Serial aEEG recordings in a cohort of extremely preterm infants: feasibility and safety.

Author information

1
Division of Neonatal and Developmental Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, Palo Alto, CA, USA.
2
Social, Statistical and Environmental Sciences Unit, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.
3
Department of Pediatrics, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USA.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA, USA.
5
Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX, USA.
6
Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA.
7
Department of Pediatrics, Women and Infants Hospital, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA.
8
Department of Pediatrics, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
9
Social, Statistical and Environmental Sciences Unit, RTI International, Rockville, MD, USA.
10
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Amplitude-integrated electroencephalography (aEEG) monitoring is increasing in the neonatal population, but the safety and feasibility of performing aEEG in extremely preterm infants have not been systematically evaluated.

STUDY DESIGN:

Inborn infants 23(0/7) to 28(6/7) weeks gestation or birth weight 401 to 1000 g were eligible. Serial, 6-h aEEG recordings were obtained from first week of life until 36 weeks postmenstrual age. Adverse events were documented, and surveys evaluated the impact of the aEEGs on routine care. Success of performing aEEGs according to protocol and aEEG quality were assessed.

RESULT:

A total of 102 infants were enrolled, with 755 recordings performed. 83% of recordings were performed according to schedule, and 96% were without adverse event. Bedside nurses reported no interference with routine care for 89% of recordings. 92% of recordings had acceptable signal quality.

CONCLUSION:

Serial aEEG monitoring is safe in preterm infants, with few adverse events and general acceptance by nursing staff.

PMID:
25474559
PMCID:
PMC4414657
DOI:
10.1038/jp.2014.217
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center