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J Korean Med Sci. 2014 Nov;29 Suppl 3:S193-200. doi: 10.3346/jkms.2014.29.S3.S193. Epub 2014 Nov 21.

Effects of platelet-rich plasma, adipose-derived stem cells, and stromal vascular fraction on the survival of human transplanted adipose tissue.

Author information

1
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
2
Medical Science Research Center, Ansan Hospital, Korea University Medical Center, Ansan, Korea.

Abstract

Traditional adipose tissue transplantation has unpredictable viability and poor absorption rates. Recent studies have reported that treatment with platelet-rich plasma (PRP), adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), and stromal vascular fraction (SVF) are related to increased survival of grafted adipose tissue. This study was the first simultaneous comparison of graft survival in combination with PRP, ASCs, and SVF. Adipose tissues were mixed with each other, injected subcutaneously into the back of nude mice, and evaluated at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Human adipocytes were grossly maintained in the ASCs and SVF mixtures. Survival of the adipose tissues with PRP was observed at 4 weeks and with SVF at 8 and 12 weeks. At 12 weeks, volume reduction in the ASCs and SVF mixtures were 36.9% and 32.1%, respectively, which were significantly different from that of the control group without adjuvant treatment, 51.0%. Neovascular structures were rarely observed in any of the groups. Our results suggest that the technique of adding ASCs or SVF to transplanted adipose tissue might be more effective than the conventional grafting method. An autologous adipose tissue graft in combination with ASCs or SVF may potentially contribute to stabilization of engraftment.

KEYWORDS:

Adipose Tissue; Platelet-Rich Plasma; Stem Cell; Tissue Graft

PMID:
25473209
PMCID:
PMC4248005
DOI:
10.3346/jkms.2014.29.S3.S193
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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