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Eur J Intern Med. 2014 Dec;25(10):922-5. doi: 10.1016/j.ejim.2014.10.020. Epub 2014 Nov 6.

Weight loss and metabolic outcomes of bariatric surgery in men versus women - A matched comparative observational cohort study.

Author information

1
Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK; Department of Obesity Medicine and Endocrinology, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust and University Teaching Hospital, Salford, UK.
2
Department of Obesity Medicine and Endocrinology, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust and University Teaching Hospital, Salford, UK. Electronic address: s.adam@doctors.org.uk.
3
Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK; Department of Bariatric and Upper Gastrointestinal Surgery, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust and University Teaching Hospital, Salford, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Despite the high prevalence of morbid obesity, the global frequency of bariatric surgery in men is significantly lower than in women. It is unclear if this is due to the perception of poorer outcomes in men.

OBJECTIVES:

Compare weight loss and metabolic outcomes in men vs. women after bariatric surgery.

SETTING:

University teaching hospital in North West England.

METHODS:

We performed an observational cohort analysis of 79 men matched to 79 women for baseline age (± 5 years), body mass index (BMI; ± 2 kg/m(2)), bariatric procedure (69 gastric bypass and 10 sleeve gastrectomy each), type 2 diabetes (33 each), and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA; 40 each).

RESULTS:

Overall mean (95% confidence interval) reduction in BMI was 17.5 (15.7-19.4) kg/m(2) (P<0.001) at 24 months. There was no significant difference between men and women in mean percentage excess BMI loss (65.8% vs. 72.9%) at 24 months. Likewise, there were significant reductions in blood pressure, glycosylated haemoglobin and total cholesterol-to-high density lipoprotein cholesterol overall but no significant gender differences. Postoperatively, 77.5% of men and 90.0% of women with OSA discontinued CPAP therapy (non-significant).

CONCLUSIONS:

Weight loss and metabolic outcomes after bariatric surgery are of similar magnitude in men compared to women. The use of bariatric surgery in eligible men should be encouraged.

KEYWORDS:

Gastric bypass; Gender variation; Hypertension; Obesity; Sleeve gastrectomy; Type 2 diabetes

PMID:
25468739
DOI:
10.1016/j.ejim.2014.10.020
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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