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Epilepsy Behav. 2015 Jan;42:147-52. doi: 10.1016/j.yebeh.2014.10.034. Epub 2014 Nov 18.

Parenting stress does not normalize after child's epilepsy surgery.

Author information

1
Sector of Neuropsychology for Children and Adolescents, University Medical Center Utrecht, PO Box 85090, 3508 AB Utrecht, The Netherlands; Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, University Medical Center Utrecht, PO Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht, The Netherlands; Department of Pediatric Psychology and Social Work, University Medical Center Utrecht, PO Box 85090, 3508 AB Utrecht, The Netherlands; Bio Research Center for Children, Wekeromseweg 8, 6816 VS Arnhem, The Netherlands. Electronic address: Obraams@umcutrecht.nl.
2
Sector of Neuropsychology for Children and Adolescents, University Medical Center Utrecht, PO Box 85090, 3508 AB Utrecht, The Netherlands; Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, University Medical Center Utrecht, PO Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht, The Netherlands; Bio Research Center for Children, Wekeromseweg 8, 6816 VS Arnhem, The Netherlands. Electronic address: meekes.joost@gmail.com.
3
Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, University Medical Center Utrecht, PO Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht, The Netherlands; Department of Child Neurology, University Medical Center Utrecht, PO Box 85090, 3508 AB Utrecht, The Netherlands. Electronic address: K.Braun@umcutrecht.nl.
4
Department of Pediatric Psychology and Social Work, University Medical Center Utrecht, PO Box 85090, 3508 AB Utrecht, The Netherlands. Electronic address: R.Schappin@umcutrecht.nl.
5
Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, University Medical Center Utrecht, PO Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht, The Netherlands; Department of Neurosurgery, University Medical Center Utrecht, PO Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht, The Netherlands. Electronic address: P.v.Rijen@umcutrecht.nl.
6
Academic Centre for Epileptology, Kempenhaeghe, Sterkselseweg 65, 5591 VE Heeze, The Netherlands; Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University, Kapittelweg 29, 6525 EN Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: HendriksM@kempenhaeghe.nl.
7
Sector of Neuropsychology for Children and Adolescents, University Medical Center Utrecht, PO Box 85090, 3508 AB Utrecht, The Netherlands; Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, University Medical Center Utrecht, PO Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht, The Netherlands; Bio Research Center for Children, Wekeromseweg 8, 6816 VS Arnhem, The Netherlands. Electronic address: A.Jennekens@umcutrecht.nl.
8
Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, University Medical Center Utrecht, PO Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht, The Netherlands; Bio Research Center for Children, Wekeromseweg 8, 6816 VS Arnhem, The Netherlands. Electronic address: OnnovanNieuwenhuizen@umcutrecht.nl.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study aimed to investigate parenting stress expressed by parents before and two years after their children's epilepsy surgery.

METHODS:

SUBJECTS:

Parents of 31 consecutively included surgery patients with epilepsy and parents of 31 healthy sex- and age-matched control children were the subjects of this study. Materials and procedure: The questionnaire 'Parenting Stress Index', which distinguishes a Parent domain (stress leading parents to feel themselves inadequate) from a Child domain (child features felt by parent to cause stress) was completed before surgery of the patients and two years thereafter. At both time points, intelligence examination of the child was part of a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment, as were evaluations of recent stress-enhancing life events and epilepsy severity.

RESULTS:

Prior to surgery, total parenting stress was significantly higher in parents of patients than in parents of controls. Two years after surgery, total parenting stress had decreased significantly in parents of patients. The scores on parent-related subscales Role Restriction and Spouse and on the child-related subscale Distractibility/Hyperactivity, all relatively high before surgery, decreased significantly. Still, parents of patients experienced significantly more stress compared with parents of controls mainly because of persistently higher stress scores in parents of patients on the subscale Role Restriction (Parent domain) and on five of six subscales in the Child domain. Intelligence of the child was associated with parenting stress: the lower the child's intelligence, the higher the stress score on the subscale Distractibility/Hyperactivity and the lower the stress score on the subscale Mood. Stress decreased more in parents of patients who became seizure-free after surgery than in parents of patients with recurrent seizures.

CONCLUSIONS:

Parenting stress decreases but does not normalize in the first two years after epilepsy surgery. Parents should be offered counseling on epilepsy-related intricacies contributing to parenting stress, immediately after diagnosis as well as after epilepsy surgery, notwithstanding the resulting seizure status of the child.

KEYWORDS:

Child; Epilepsy; Parenting; Stress; Surgery

PMID:
25468727
DOI:
10.1016/j.yebeh.2014.10.034
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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