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J Sci Med Sport. 2015 Nov;18(6):626-31. doi: 10.1016/j.jsams.2014.11.006. Epub 2014 Nov 13.

The effect of the addition of hip strengthening exercises to a lumbopelvic exercise programme for the treatment of non-specific low back pain: A randomized controlled trial.

Author information

1
Running Injury Clinic, Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Calgary, Canada; School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Faculty of Health, Queensland University of Technology, Australia. Electronic address: karen.kendall@qut.edu.au.
2
Sport Medicine Centre, Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Calgary, Canada; Departments of Community Health Sciences and Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Canada.
3
Sport Medicine Centre, Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Calgary, Canada.
4
Running Injury Clinic, Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Calgary, Canada; Faculty of Nursing, University of Calgary, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To compare the efficacy of two exercise programmes in reducing pain and disability for individuals with non-specific low back pain and to examine the underlying mechanical factors related to pain and disability for individuals with NSLBP.

DESIGN:

A single-blind, randomized controlled trial.

METHODS:

Eighty participants were recruited from eleven community-based general medical practices and randomized into two groups completing either a lumbopelvic motor control or a combined lumbopelvic motor control and progressive hip strengthening exercise therapy programme. All participants received an education session, 6 rehabilitation sessions including real time ultrasound training, and a home based exercise programme manual and log book. The primary outcomes were pain (0-100 mm visual analogue scale), and disability (Oswestry Disability Index V2). The secondary outcomes were hip strength (N/kg) and two-dimensional frontal plane biomechanics (°) measure during the static Trendelenburg test and while walking. All outcomes were measured at baseline and at 6-week follow up.

RESULTS:

There was no statistical difference in the change in pain (x¯ = -4.0 mm, t = -1.07, p = 0.29, 95%CI -11.5, 3.5) or disability (x¯ = -0.3%, t = -0.19, p = 0.85, 95%CI -3.5, 2.8) between groups. Within group comparisons revealed clinically meaningful reductions in pain for both Group One (x¯ = -20.9 mm, 95%CI -25.7, -16.1) and Group Two (x¯ = -24.9, 95%CI -30.8, -19.0).

CONCLUSIONS:

Both exercise programmes had similar efficacy in reducing pain. The addition of hip strengthening exercises to a motor control exercise programme does not appear to result in improved clinical outcome for pain for individuals with non-specific low back pain.

KEYWORDS:

Chronic disease; Exercise therapy; Kinematics; Rehabilitation

PMID:
25467200
DOI:
10.1016/j.jsams.2014.11.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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