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Nat Commun. 2014 Dec 3;5:5642. doi: 10.1038/ncomms6642.

Freezing-in orientational disorder induces crossover from thermally-activated to temperature-independent transport in organic semiconductors.

Author information

1
Department of Physics, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109, USA.
2
School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332, USA.
3
Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, USA.
4
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798, Singapore.
5
Department of Chemistry, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109, USA.

Abstract

The crystalline structure of organic materials dictates their physical properties, but while significant research effort is geared towards understanding structure-property relationships in such materials, the details remain unclear. Many organic crystals exhibit transitions in their electrical properties as a function of temperature. One example is the 1:1 charge-transfer complex trans--stilbene-2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane. Here we show that the mobility and resistivity of this material undergo a transition from being thermally activated at temperatures above 235 K to being temperature independent at low temperatures. On the basis of our experimental and theoretical results, we attribute this behaviour to the presence of a glass-like transition and the accompanied freezing-in of orientational disorder of the stilbene molecule.

PMID:
25466276
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms6642

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