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Cell Rep. 2014 Dec 11;9(5):1959-1965. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2014.10.065. Epub 2014 Nov 26.

Global proteome turnover analyses of the Yeasts S. cerevisiae and S. pombe.

Author information

1
Department of Cell Biology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA; Department of Genetics and Complex Diseases, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
2
Mass spectrometry core facility, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, 82152 Martinsried, Germany.
3
Department of Cell Biology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA; Department of Genetics and Complex Diseases, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. Electronic address: twalther@hsph.harvard.edu.

Abstract

How cells maintain specific levels of each protein and whether that control is evolutionarily conserved are key questions. Here, we report proteome-wide steady-state protein turnover rate measurements for the evolutionarily distant but ecologically similar yeasts, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We find that the half-life of most proteins is much longer than currently thought and determined to a large degree by protein synthesis and dilution due to cell division. However, we detect a significant subset of proteins (∼15%) in both yeasts that are turned over rapidly. In addition, the relative abundances of orthologous proteins between the two yeasts are highly conserved across the 400 million years of evolution. In contrast, their respective turnover rates differ considerably. Our data provide a high-confidence resource for studying protein degradation in common yeast model systems.

PMID:
25466257
PMCID:
PMC4526151
DOI:
10.1016/j.celrep.2014.10.065
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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