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Food Chem. 2015 Apr 15;173:864-72. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2014.09.156. Epub 2014 Oct 18.

The tomato sauce making process affects the bioaccessibility and bioavailability of tomato phenolics: a pharmacokinetic study.

Author information

1
Department of Nutrition and Food Science-XARTA-INSA, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; CIBER 06/003 Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBEROBN), Institute of Health Carlos III, Spain.
2
Department of Nutrition and Food Science-XARTA-INSA, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Ingenio CONSOLIDER Program, FUN-C-FOOD (CSD2007-063), Barcelona, Spain; Biomedical Research Institute (IBIMA), Service of Endocrinology and Nutrition, Málaga Hospital Complex (Virgen de la Victoria), Campus de Teatinos s/n, University of Málaga, Malaga 29010, Spain.
3
CIBER 06/003 Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBEROBN), Institute of Health Carlos III, Spain; Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital Clinic, Institute of Biomedical Investigation August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), University of Barcelona, Spain.
4
CIBER 06/003 Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBEROBN), Institute of Health Carlos III, Spain; Department of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Technology, Biopharmaceutics and Pharmacokinetics Unit, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
5
Department of Nutrition and Food Science-XARTA-INSA, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
6
CIBER 06/003 Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBEROBN), Institute of Health Carlos III, Spain; Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain.
7
Department of Nutrition and Food Science-XARTA-INSA, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; CIBER 06/003 Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBEROBN), Institute of Health Carlos III, Spain; Ingenio CONSOLIDER Program, FUN-C-FOOD (CSD2007-063), Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: lamuela@ub.edu.

Abstract

Tomato sauce is the most commonly consumed processed tomato product worldwide, but very little is known about how the manufacturing process may affect the phenolic composition and bioavailability after consumption. In a prospective randomised, cross-over intervention study, we analysed the plasma and urinary levels of tomato phenolic compounds and their metabolites after acute consumption of raw tomatoes and tomato sauce, enriched or not with refined olive oil during production. Respectively, eleven and four phenolic metabolites were found in urine and plasma samples. The plasma concentration and urinary excretion of naringenin glucuronide were both significantly higher after the consumption of tomato sauce than raw tomatoes. The results suggest that the mechanical and thermal treatments during tomato sauce manufacture may help to deliver these potentially bioactive phenolics from the food matrix more effectively than the addition of an oil component, thus increasing their bioavailability.

KEYWORDS:

Bioavailability; Cooking; Naringenin; Olive oil; Phase II metabolites; Phenolic compounds; Tomato sauce

PMID:
25466100
DOI:
10.1016/j.foodchem.2014.09.156
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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