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Food Chem. 2015 Apr 15;173:468-74. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2014.09.159. Epub 2014 Oct 7.

The pressure-induced, lactose-dependent changes in the composition and size of casein micelles.

Author information

1
Key Laboratory of Functional Dairy, College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing, PR China; Beijing Laboratory for Food Quality and Safety, Beijing, PR China.
2
Beijing Higher Institution Engineering Research Center of Animal Product, Beijing, PR China.
3
Key Laboratory of Functional Dairy, College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing, PR China; Beijing Laboratory for Food Quality and Safety, Beijing, PR China. Electronic address: renfazheng@263.net.

Abstract

The effects of lactose on the changes in the composition and size of casein micelles induced by high-pressure treatment and the related mechanism of action were investigated. Dispersions of ultracentrifuged casein micelle pellets with 0-10% (w/v) lactose were subjected to high pressure (400 MPa) at 20 °C for 40 min. The results indicated that the level of non-sedimentable caseins was positively related to the amount of lactose added prior to pressure treatment, and negatively correlated to the size. A mechanism for the pressure-induced, lactose-dependent changes in the casein micelles is proposed. Lactose inhibits the hydrophobic interactions between the micellar fragments during or after pressure release, through the hydrophilic layer formed by their hydrogen bonds around the micellar fragments. In addition, lactose does not favour the association between calcium and the casein aggregates after pressure release. Due to these two functions, lactose inhibited the formation of larger micelles after pressure treatment.

KEYWORDS:

Casein micelles; High pressure; Lactose; Physicochemical properties

PMID:
25466047
DOI:
10.1016/j.foodchem.2014.09.159
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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