Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Micron. 2015 Jan;68:70-76. doi: 10.1016/j.micron.2014.09.004. Epub 2014 Sep 26.

A correlative optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy approach to locating nanoparticles in brain tumors.

Author information

1
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4034, USA. Electronic address: pkempen@stanford.edu.
2
Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-5427, USA; Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065, USA; Department of Radiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10021, USA; Brain Tumor Center, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065, USA; Center for Molecular Imaging and Nanotechnology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065, USA.
3
Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-5427, USA; Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA; Department of Structural Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
4
Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-5427, USA.
5
Department of Neurology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065, USA; Human Oncology & Pathogenesis Program, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065, USA; Department of Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10021, USA.
6
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4034, USA; Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-5427, USA; Department of Bio-engineering and Bio-X Program, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-5427, USA.
7
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4034, USA.

Abstract

The growing use of nanoparticles in biomedical applications, including cancer diagnosis and treatment, demands the capability to exactly locate them within complex biological systems. In this work a correlative optical and scanning electron microscopy technique was developed to locate and observe multi-modal gold core nanoparticle accumulation in brain tumor models. Entire brain sections from mice containing orthotopic brain tumors injected intravenously with nanoparticles were imaged using both optical microscopy to identify the brain tumor, and scanning electron microscopy to identify the individual nanoparticles. Gold-based nanoparticles were readily identified in the scanning electron microscope using backscattered electron imaging as bright spots against a darker background. This information was then correlated to determine the exact location of the nanoparticles within the brain tissue. The nanoparticles were located only in areas that contained tumor cells, and not in the surrounding healthy brain tissue. This correlative technique provides a powerful method to relate the macro- and micro-scale features visible in light microscopy with the nanoscale features resolvable in scanning electron microscopy.

KEYWORDS:

Cancer diagnosis; Correlative microscopy; Nanotechnology; Optical microscopy; Scanning electron microscopy

PMID:
25464144
PMCID:
PMC4262686
DOI:
10.1016/j.micron.2014.09.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center