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Health Place. 2015 Jan;31:65-74. doi: 10.1016/j.healthplace.2014.11.001. Epub 2014 Nov 25.

The Neighbourhood Effects on Health and Well-being (NEHW) study.

Author information

1
Centre for Research on Inner City Health, Keenan Research Centre, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael׳s Hospital, 30 Bond Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5B 1W8; Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, 155 College Street, 6th Floor, Toronto, ON, Canada, M5T 3M7; Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES), 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada M4N 3M5. Electronic address: o'campop@smh.ca.
2
Department of Sociology, University of Toronto, 725 Spadina Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada M5S 2J4.
3
Centre for Research on Inner City Health, Keenan Research Centre, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael׳s Hospital, 30 Bond Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5B 1W8.
4
Centre for Research on Inner City Health, Keenan Research Centre, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael׳s Hospital, 30 Bond Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5B 1W8; Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES), 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada M4N 3M5.
5
Centre for Research on Inner City Health, Keenan Research Centre, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael׳s Hospital, 30 Bond Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5B 1W8; Department of Health, Aging, and Society, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4M4; Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES), 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada M4N 3M5.

Abstract

Many cross-sectional studies of neighbourhood effects on health do not employ strong study design elements. The Neighbourhood Effects on Health and Well-being (NEHW) study, a random sample of 2412 English-speaking Toronto residents (age 25-64), utilises strong design features for sampling neighbourhoods and individuals, characterising neighbourhoods using a variety of data sources, measuring a wide range of health outcomes, and for analysing cross-level interactions. We describe here methodological issues that shaped the design and analysis features of the NEHW study to ensure that, while a cross-sectional sample, it will advance the quality of evidence emerging from observational studies.

KEYWORDS:

Cross-level interactions; Health; Multilevel; Neighbourhood; Sampling

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