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Health Place. 2015 Jan;31:17-23. doi: 10.1016/j.healthplace.2014.10.010. Epub 2014 Nov 14.

Neighborhood contextual factors for smoking among middle-aged Japanese: a multilevel analysis.

Author information

1
School of International Liberal Studies, Chukyo University, 101 Tokodachi, Kaizu-cho, Toyota, Aichi, 470-0393 Japan. Electronic address: info@hanibuchi.com.
2
Department of Geography and Research Institute for Disaster Mitigation of Urban Cultural Heritage, Ritsumeikan University, 58 Komatsubara Kitamachi, Kita-ku, Kyoto, 603-8341 Japan. Electronic address: nakaya@lt.ritsumei.ac.jp.
3
Global Collaboration Center, Osaka University, 2-7 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 Japan. Electronic address: khonjo@glocol.osaka-u.ac.jp.
4
Epidemiology and Prevention Group, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo, 104-0045 Japan. Electronic address: ai-ikeda@umin.ac.jp.
5
Public Health Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka, Japan. Electronic address: iso@pbhel.med.osaka-u.ac.jp.
6
Epidemiology and Prevention Group, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo, 104-0045 Japan; Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033 Japan. Electronic address: mnminoue@ncc.go.jp.
7
Epidemiology and Prevention Group, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo, 104-0045 Japan. Electronic address: nsawada@ncc.go.jp.
8
Epidemiology and Prevention Group, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo, 104-0045 Japan. Electronic address: stsugane@ncc.go.jp.

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to explore neighborhood contextual factors in terms of smoking behaviors among middle-aged Japanese, by using a multilevel analysis. Subjects were Japanese men and women, between 40 and 59 years of age (40,961 for the cross-sectional analysis, and 9,177 for the longitudinal analysis), nested in 39 neighborhoods (Kyuson). The results showed that women in a less residentially stable neighborhood were more likely to be smokers. No associations were seen between current smoking and neighborhood deprivation; however, women in the most deprived neighborhood were more likely to quit smoking. This study is the first to demonstrate the associations between neighborhood environment and current smoking or smoking cessation, in a Japanese setting. The findings imply that policy makers should consider targeting neighborhood conditions in order to help reduce smoking prevalence, especially among women.

KEYWORDS:

Japan; Multilevel analysis; Neighborhoods; Smoking

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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