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Early Hum Dev. 2014 Dec;90(12):885-90. doi: 10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2014.09.005. Epub 2014 Oct 23.

Mother-infant circadian rhythm: development of individual patterns and dyadic synchrony.

Author information

1
Department of Family and Child Nursing, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-7262, United States. Electronic address: kthomas@uw.edu.
2
Department of Biobehavioral Nursing and Health Systems, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-7266, United States.
3
Barnard Center for Infant Mental Health & Development, Department of Family and Child Nursing, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-7262, United States.
4
Department of Family and Child Nursing, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-7262, United States.
5
Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1525, United States.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Mutual circadian rhythm is an early and essential component in the development of maternal-infant physiological synchrony.

AIMS:

The aim of this to examine the longitudinal pattern of maternal-infant circadian rhythm and rhythm synchrony as measured by rhythm parameters.

STUDY DESIGN:

In-home dyadic actigraphy monitoring at infant age 4, 8, and 12 weeks.

SUBJECTS:

Forty-three healthy mother-infant pairs.

OUTCOME MEASURES:

Circadian parameters derived from cosinor and non-parametric analysis including mesor, magnitude, acrophase, L5 and M10 midpoints (midpoint of lowest 5 and highest 10h of activity), amplitude, interdaily stability (IS), and intradaily variability (IV).

RESULTS:

Mothers experienced early disruption of circadian rhythm, with re-establishment of rhythm over time. Significant time effects were noted in increasing maternal magnitude, amplitude, and IS and decreasing IV (p<.001). Infants demonstrated a developmental trajectory of circadian pattern with significant time effects for increasing mesor, magnitude, amplitude, L5, IS, and IV (p<.001). By 12 weeks, infant phase advancement was evidenced by mean acrophase and M10 midpoint occurring 60 and 43 min (respectively) earlier than at 4 weeks. While maternal acrophase remained consistent over time, infants became increasingly phase advanced relative to mother and mean infant acrophase at 12 weeks occurred 60 min before mother. Mother-infant synchrony was evidenced in increasing correspondence of acrophase at 12 weeks (r=0.704), L5 (r=0.453) and M10 (r=0.479) midpoints.

CONCLUSIONS:

Development of mother-infant synchrony reflects shared elements of circadian rhythm.

KEYWORDS:

Circadian rhythm; Development; Maternal–infant; Synchrony

PMID:
25463836
PMCID:
PMC4312214
DOI:
10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2014.09.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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