Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Virology. 2015 Jan 1;474:186-98. doi: 10.1016/j.virol.2014.10.018. Epub 2014 Nov 19.

A simian hemorrhagic fever virus isolate from persistently infected baboons efficiently induces hemorrhagic fever disease in Japanese macaques.

Author information

1
Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30302, United States.
2
Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, United States.
3
Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, Beaverton, OR 97006, United States.
4
Division of Pathobiology and Immunology, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Beaverton, OR 97006, United States.
5
Division of Comparative Medicine, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Beaverton, OR 97006, United States.
6
Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, Beaverton, OR 97006, United States; Division of Pathobiology and Immunology, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Beaverton, OR 97006, United States.
7
Southwest National Primate Research Center, Texas Biomedical Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78227, United States.
8
Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30302, United States. Electronic address: mbrinton@gsu.edu.

Abstract

Simian hemorrhagic fever virus is an arterivirus that naturally infects species of African nonhuman primates causing acute or persistent asymptomatic infections. Although it was previously estimated that 1% of baboons are SHFV-positive, more than 10% of wild-caught and captive-bred baboons tested were SHFV positive and the infections persisted for more than 10 years with detectable virus in the blood (100-1000 genomes/ml). The sequences of two baboon SHFV isolates that were amplified by a single passage in primary macaque macrophages had a high degree of identity to each other as well as to the genome of SHFV-LVR, a laboratory strain isolated in the 1960s. Infection of Japanese macaques with 100PFU of a baboon isolate consistently produced high level viremia, pro-inflammatory cytokines, elevated tissue factor levels and clinical signs indicating coagulation defects. The baboon virus isolate provides a reliable BSL2 model of viral hemorrhagic fever disease in macaques.

KEYWORDS:

Baboon; Coagulopathy; Hemorrhagic fever disease; Japanese macaque; Persistent infection; Simian hemorrhagic fever virus

PMID:
25463617
PMCID:
PMC4304765
DOI:
10.1016/j.virol.2014.10.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center