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Virology. 2015 Jan 1;474:10-8. doi: 10.1016/j.virol.2014.10.015. Epub 2014 Nov 7.

Primate lentiviruses are differentially inhibited by interferon-induced transmembrane proteins.

Author information

1
Lady Davis Institute, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3T 1E2; Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3A 2B4.
2
Lady Davis Institute, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3T 1E2.
3
Lady Davis Institute, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3T 1E2; Department of Microbiology and Immunology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3A 2B4.
4
Department of Molecular Microbiology & Immunology, School of Medicine, Bond Life Sciences Center, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211-7310, USA.
5
Lady Davis Institute, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3T 1E2; Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3A 2B4; Department of Microbiology and Immunology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3A 2B4. Electronic address: chen.liang@mcgill.ca.

Abstract

Interferon-induced transmembrane (IFITM) proteins inhibit the entry of a large number of viruses. Not surprisingly, many viruses are refractory to this inhibition. In this study, we report that different strains of HIV and SIV are inhibited by human IFITM proteins to various degrees, with SIV of African green monkeys (SIV(AGM)) being mostly restricted by human IFITM2. Interestingly, SIV(AGM) is as much inhibited by human IFITM2 as by IFITM3 of its own host African green monkeys. Our data further demonstrate that the entry of SIV(AGM) is impaired by human IFITM2 and that this inhibition is overcome by the cholesterol-binding compound amphotericin B that also overcomes IFITM inhibition of influenza A viruses. These results suggest that IFITM proteins exploit similar mechanisms to inhibit the entry of both pH-independent primate lentiviruses and the pH-dependent influenza A viruses.

KEYWORDS:

HIV; IFITM; SIV; Virus entry

PMID:
25463599
PMCID:
PMC4581848
DOI:
10.1016/j.virol.2014.10.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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